Latest Posts › Class Action

Share:

Wrap-up: “Who is Winning the Securities Class Action War—Plaintiffs or Defendants?”

I am grateful for the enthusiastic feedback I’ve received on my three-part blog post “Who is Winning the Securities Class Action War—Plaintiffs or Defendants?” I especially appreciate the time Kevin LaCroix took to write a...more

Who Is Winning the Securities Class Action War—Plaintiffs or Defendants? (Part III)

This is the third of a three-part post that analyzes why plaintiffs are winning the securities class action war and what defendants can do about it....more

Who is Winning the Securities Class Action War—Plaintiffs or Defendants? (Part II)

This is the second of a three-part post evaluating who is winning the securities class action war. Part I explained that this war is not just a scorecard of wins and losses, but rather a fight for strategic...more

Who is Winning the Securities Class Action War—Plaintiffs or Defendants?

The securities class action war is about far more than the height of the pleading hurdles plaintiffs must clear, the scorecard of motions to dismiss won and lost, or median settlement amounts. It is a fight for strategic...more

Myths & Misconceptions of Biotech Securities Claims: An Analysis of Motion to Dismiss Results (2005-2016)

There is a common life cycle for Directors and Officers Liability for a publicly-traded biotechnology company bringing its first drug or device to the market. In the early stages, whether pre-clinical or Phase 1, there is...more

Be Careful What You Wish For, Part II: Would Companies Be Better Off Without the Fraud-on-the-Market Doctrine?

The villain in the fight against securities class actions is the fraud-on-the-market presumption of reliance established by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1988 in Basic Inc. v. Levinson, 485 U.S. 224 (1988). Without Basic, the...more

Be Careful What You Wish For, Part I: Does the Reform Act Need Reforming?

The history of securities and corporate governance litigation is full of wishes about the law that we later regret (or will), or are happy were not granted. Many of these are not obvious—and some will surprise people. From...more

3 Key Securities Litigation Developments of 2016

Among securities litigators, there is no consensus about the importance of developments in securities and corporate governance litigation. For some, a Supreme Court decision is always supreme. For others, a major change in...more

Lessons Learned in London

Earlier this month, I spent a week in the birthplace of D&O insurance, London. In addition to moderating a panel at Advisen’s European Executive Risks Insights Conference, I met with many energetic and talented D&O insurance...more

Are We Headed into a Perfect Storm of Securities Class Action Filings?

The history of securities litigation is marked by particular types of cases that come in waves: ..the IPO laddering cases, which involved more than 300 issuers and their underwriters; ..the Sarbanes-Oxley era...more

5 Wishes for Securities Litigation Defense: Early Damages Analysis and Discovery

The fifth of my “5 Wishes for Securities Litigation Defense” (April 30, 2016 post) is to move securities class action damages expert reports and discovery ahead of fact discovery. This simple change would allow the...more

Imposing Section 10(b) Liability Against Defrauded Corporation Reads Scienter Element out of Statute—An Analysis of In re...

From time to time, D&O Developments will take a closer look at an important issue decided in an appellate opinion. In this post, I analyze In re ChinaCast Education Corp. Securities Litigation, 809 F.3d 471 (9th Cir. 2015),...more

5 Wishes for Securities Litigation Defense: Greater Director Involvement in Securities Litigation Defense and D&O Insurance

One of my “5 Wishes for Securities Litigation Defense” (April 30, 2016 post) is greater involvement by boards of directors in decisions concerning D&O insurance and the defense of securities litigation, including...more

5 Wishes for Securities Litigation Defense: A Defense-Counsel Interview Process in All Cases

One of my “5 Wishes for Securities Litigation Defense” (April 30, 2016 post) is to require an interview process for the selection of defense counsel in all cases. When a public company purchases a significant good or...more

Omnicare, Inc., One Year Later: Its Salutary Impact on Securities-Fraud Class Actions in the Lower Federal Courts

Just over a year ago, on March 24, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in Omnicare, Inc. v. Laborers District Council Construction Industry Pension Fund. Omnicare held that a statement of opinion is only false...more

5 Wishes for Securities Litigation Defense: Greater Insurer Involvement in Defense-Counsel Selection and Strategy

One of my “5 Wishes for Securities Litigation Defense” last month was for greater D&O insurer involvement in securities class action defense. This simple step would have extensive benefits for public companies and their...more

5 Wishes for Securities Litigation Defense

I am committed to helping shape a system for securities litigation defense that helps directors and officers get through securities litigation safely and efficiently, without losing their serenity or dignity, or facing any...more

Why I’m So Passionate about Omnicare

On March 24, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its opinion in Omnicare, Inc. v. Laborers Dist. Council Const. Industry Pension Fund, 135 S. Ct. 1318 (2015). My partner Claire Davis and I are publishing a forthcoming...more

Reform Act Report Card: The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act, 20 Years Later

In 2015, the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act* turned twenty years old. Over my career as a securities litigator, I’ve seen both sides of the securities-litigation divide that the Reform Act created. In the...more

Securities Class Action Defense Counsel Selection: An Interview Process is Essential

When a public company purchases a significant good or service, it typically seeks competitive proposals. From coffee machines to architects, companies invite multiple vendors to bid, evaluate their proposals, and choose one...more

Fixing the Economics of Securities Class Action Defense: Nationwide Defense by Regional Firms

In my last D&O Discourse post, I discussed why changes to the securities litigation defense bar are inevitable: in a nutshell, the economic structures of the typical securities defense firms – mostly national law firms –...more

The Future of Securities Class Action Litigation

Securities litigation has a culture defined by multiple elements: the types of cases filed, the plaintiffs’ lawyers who file them, the defense counsel who defend them, the characteristics of the insurance that covers them,...more

Cybersecurity Securities Class Actions: A Wave or Trickle?

One of the foremost uncertainties in securities and corporate governance litigation is the extent to which cybersecurity will become a significant D&O liability issue. Although many D&O practitioners have been bracing for a...more

Securities Litigation Economics: A Blast from the Past

Securities litigation headlines are dominated by mega-cases. But the majority of securities class actions are brought against smaller companies. And it appears that plaintiffs’ lawyers are filing an increasingly large number...more

The Root Cause of Skyrocketing Securities Class Action Defense Costs

Why do the costs of defending securities class actions continue to increase? Because of my writing on the subject) I’m asked about the issue a lot. My answer has evolved from blaming biglaw economics – a combination of...more

35 Results
/
View per page
Page: of 2

"My best business intelligence,
in one easy email…"

Your first step to building a free, personalized, morning email brief covering pertinent authors and topics on JD Supra:
Sign up using*

Already signed up? Log in here

*By using the service, you signify your acceptance of JD Supra's Privacy Policy.
*With LinkedIn, you don't need to create a separate login to manage your free JD Supra account, and we can make suggestions based on your needs and interests. We will not post anything on LinkedIn in your name. Or, sign up using your email address.