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Where Do the Supreme Court’s Civil Cases Originate (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we began our year-by-year review of where the Court’s civil cases have originated since 1994. By doing so, we can see trends in the administrative and executive agencies where the Court’s cases come from. Last...more

Where Do the Supreme Court’s Civil Cases Originate (Part 1)?

In our recent expansion of Sedgwick’s California Supreme Court database, one of the variables we added was the originating jurisdiction. Given that the Court always has a significant number of administrative mandate cases,...more

What Can We Infer When Chief Justice Karmeier Asks the First Question in Civil Cases?

Yesterday, we began our analysis of the Chief Justice’s question patterns in civil cases from 2008 through 2016. Today, we address the Chief Justice’s patterns in criminal cases. When voting with the majority in an...more

How Have Public Entities Fared in Civil Cases (Part 2 – 2006-2016)?

Last time, we looked at public entities’ winning percentage in civil cases at the California Supreme Court between 1994 and 2005. Today, we look at the second half of our study period – how did public entities fare between...more

What Can We Infer From Chief Justice Karmeier’s Question Patterns in Civil Cases?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing Justice Thomas’ question patterns in oral arguments since 2008, and whether it’s possible to infer his likely vote and whether he’s writing an opinion. This week, we turn to Chief...more

How Have Public Entities Fared in Civil Cases? (Part I – 1994-2005)

Last week, we looked at how defendants have fared in criminal cases. Of course, in a sense that amounts to asking how prosecutors are doing. So this week, we ask the flip side of that question – how have public entities...more

What Can We Infer When Justice Thomas Asks the First Question in a Criminal Case?

Yesterday, we analyzed whether it’s possible to infer Justice Thomas’ vote and whether or not he’s writing an opinion based upon the pattern of his questions in criminal cases. Today, we look at whether it’s more likely that...more

6/14/2017  /  Appeals , IL Supreme Court , Reversal

What Can We Infer From Justice Thomas’ Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we analyzed the pattern of Justice Thomas’ questions in oral arguments in civil cases. This week, we address Justice Thomas’ patterns in criminal cases. When Justice Thomas is in the majority, he questions the...more

Are Defendants Winning Criminal Appeals More Often (Part 2 – 2006-2016)?

On June 8, 2017, we looked at whether defendants are winning a higher fraction of appeals in criminal cases between 1994 and 2005. Today, we’re looking at the years 2006 through 2016. In 2010, defendants won eleven...more

Are Defendants Winning Criminal Appeals More Often (Part 1 – 1994-2005)?

Earlier this week, I joined “Air Talk” on KPCC radio for a discussion of the California Supreme Court’s recent criminal decisions, beginning with People v. Gutierrez, in which the Court reversed three convictions for the...more

What Can We Infer When Justice Thomas Asks the First Question in a Civil Case?

On June 6, 2017, we analyzed whether we can infer Justice Thomas’ votes and whether or not he’s writing an opinion based upon the pattern of his questions at oral arguments in civil cases. Today, we ask a different question...more

What Can We Infer From Justice Thomas’ Question Patterns in Civil Cases?

Last week, we completed our two-week examination of Justice Kilbride’s patterns in oral arguments for civil and criminal cases between 2008 and 2016. Today, we begin our examination of Justice Thomas’ patterns. In Table...more

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Criminal Cases (Part 2)?

On June 1, 2017, we analyzed the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases between 1994 and 2005. Today, we’ll look at the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases between 2006 and 2016....more

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Criminal Cases (Part 1)?

Last week, we examined whether winning parties tended to average more amicus support in civil cases between 1994 and 2016. This week, we look at the Court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases. In Table 215,...more

What Can We Infer When Justice Kilbride Asks the First Question in Criminal Cases?

Yesterday, we analyzed whether it’s possible, based on all oral arguments in criminal cases between 2009 and 2016, to infer from watching Justice Kilbride’s question patterns in criminal cases how he’s voting, and whether...more

What Can We Infer From Justice Kilbride’s Question Patterns in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we analyzed the pattern of Justice Kilbride’s questions in oral arguments in civil cases, asking whether it’s possible to infer who Justice Kilbride will vote for and whether or not he’s writing an opinion. This...more

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Civil Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we reviewed who averaged the most amicus support in civil cases between 1994 and 2005 – winning parties, losers, or parties who won only in part. Today, we address the data for the years 2006 through...more

5/29/2017  /  Amicus Briefs , Appeals

Do Winning Parties Tend to Have More Amicus Support in Civil Cases (Part 1)?

For the past two weeks, we’ve been reviewing the data on the Supreme Court’s experience with amicus briefs, asking whether petitioners or respondents tend to average more amicus support. Now, as a further step towards...more

What Can We infer When Justice Kilbride Asks the First Question in Civil Cases?

Yesterday, we asked whether we can infer anything about Justice Kilbride’s vote and whether he’s writing an opinion, based on the pattern of his questions in oral argument. Today, we ask a slightly different question – can...more

What Can We Infer From Justice Kilbride’s Question Patterns in Civil Cases?

Over the last two weeks, we’ve reviewed Justice Freeman’s question patterns in civil and criminal cases. This week, we’ll be reviewing Justice Kilbride’s patterns with his questioning in civil cases. Justice Kilbride...more

Which Side Tends to File the Most Amicus Briefs in Criminal Cases (Part 2)?

Yesterday, we looked at the court’s experience with amicus briefs in criminal cases for the first half of our study period, 1994-2005. Today, we look at the data for the second half of the period. For the most part, the...more

Which Side Tends to File the Most Amicus Briefs in Criminal Cases (Part 1)?

Last week, we reviewed the year-by-year data since 1994 for amicus briefs, looking at whether more amici tend to support the petitioner or the respondent. This week, we’re looking at the Court’s experience with amicus briefs...more

What Can We Infer When Justice Freeman Asks the First Question in a Criminal Case?

Yesterday, we showed that unlike many of his colleagues, Justice Freeman does not tend to ask the party he’s voting against more questions at oral argument – he averages more questions to the appellants in every scenario. ...more

What Can We Infer From Justice Freeman’s Question Pattern in Criminal Cases?

Last week, we looked at the pattern of Justice Freeman’s questioning in oral arguments in civil cases, analyzing whether he tends to ask more questions of the party he will ultimately vote against, and what impact writing an...more

Which Side Tends to File the Most Amicus Briefs in Civil Cases (Part 2)?

On May 11, 2017, we looked at the year-by-year data in civil cases, dividing total amicus briefs up by the side supported – petitioner, respondent, and neither side/can’t determine. We discovered that three quarters of the...more

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