Civil Remedies Civil Procedure Intellectual Property

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Jordan-Benel v. Universal City Studios, Inc. - USDC, C.D. California, June 24, 2015

District Court allows screenwriter’s suit alleging feature film The Purge was based on his screenplay, Settler’s Day, to proceed, denying defendants’ anti-SLAPP motion because acts supporting plaintiff’s implied contract...more

No “Apportionment” Requirement for Design Patent Damages - Apple, Inc. v. Samsung Elecs. Am., Inc.

Addressing the issue of damages for trade dress and design patents, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit upheld the bulk of Apple’s roughly $930 million damages award, noting that there is no apportionment...more

Supreme Court: No Patent Royalties May Accrue After Patent Expiration

With Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC, the U.S. Supreme Court upheld the controversial Brulotte v.Thys Co. decision, which prohibited collection of patent-based royalties that accrue after patent expiration. The Court...more

Emergency Motion to Stay Granted Where PTAB Issued Decision Invalidating All Asserted Claims

Defendants filed an emergency motion to stay the case pending an appeal of the PTAB's decision that invalidated all of the asserted claims in the patent-in-suit. Earlier in this case, Defendants had petitioned for inter...more

How Not to Get Snared in Brulotte’s Web

The Supreme Court’s Kimble Decision Reminds Licensors and Licensees to Evaluate Post-Expiration Royalties with Care - On June 22, 2015, the Supreme Court, in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC, declined to overrule–on...more

Everything Old is New Again: Post-Expiration Patent Royalties are a Bad Idea!

On Monday, the United States Supreme Court upheld the longstanding case law that prohibits a patent owner from receiving royalties after a patent has expired. In Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC (June 22, 2015) 2015 U.S....more

How a Trade Secret Could Have Saved a Running Royalty From a Nearly Invincible Law

In Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC, just handed down June 22, 2015, the Supreme Court reaffirmed the 50 year old holding of Brulotte v. Thys Co., 379 U. S. 29 (1964), that patent royalties cannot extend beyond the...more

Kimble v. Marvel: Supreme Court affirms unenforceability of contract provisions that run royalties beyond patent’s term: 3...

The Supreme Court this week upheld a long-standing precedent that restricts the ability of a patent holder to charge a royalty beyond the term of a patent. In a 6-3 decision, the court in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment...more

Sirius Wins One in Florida, Florida, Florida!

On June 22, 2015, the Southern District of Florida held that artists have no public performance rights in their pre-1972 sound recordings under Florida law, in contrast to decisions from California and New York in related...more

High Court Upholds Ban On Post-Expiration Patent Royalties While Recommending Loopholes

Background - On Monday, the U.S. Supreme Court left intact a 50-year-old rule prohibiting royalties for post-expiration use of a patent. In Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC, No. 13-720 litigation arose from Marvel’s...more

Litigation Alert: Even Spider-Man Can't Defeat Ban on Post-Patent Expiration Royalties

Fifty years ago, in Brulotte v. Thys Co., the U.S. Supreme Court held that “a patentee’s use of a royalty agreement that projects beyond the expiration date of the patent is unlawful per se.” 379 U.S. 29, 32 (1964). On June...more

Supreme Court Keeps Spider-Man Maintaining The Status Quo - Royalties End When The Patent Expires

On June 22, 2015, the United States Supreme Court issued its decision in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC, 576 U. S. ____ upholding a long-standing 50-year rule from Brulotte v. Thys Co., 379 U.S. 29 (1964) that prevents...more

Design Patents and the Hague Agreement

Design patents protect the visual characteristics or aspects (e.g., appearance, ornamentation) of any article of manufacture. A design patent can be used to prevent competitors from producing similar items (e.g., knock-offs)...more

U.S. Supreme Court Reaffirms Prohibition on Post-Expiration Patent Royalties, and the Vitality of Stare Decisis, in the Kimble...

On June 22, 2015, in a 6-3 decision in Kimble et al. v. Marvel Enterprises, LLC, 576 U.S. __ (2015), the United States Supreme Court reaffirmed its holding in Brulotte v. Thys, 379 U.S. 29 (1964), that it is per se patent...more

Supreme Court Affirms that a Patent Holder Cannot Charge Royalties for Post-Expiration Use of the Invention

More than fifty years ago, the United States Supreme Court held that a patent holder cannot receive royalties for sales made after the patent expires because this arrangement would effectively extend the life of the patent....more

U.S. Supreme Court Preserves 50-Year-Old Rule Barring Post-Patent Royalties

On Monday, June 22, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a 6-3 decision in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, declining to reverse longstanding, yet controversial, precedent holding post-patent term royalties to be unlawful per...more

The Finite Life of a Patent Upheld: No Royalties After Expiration

The U.S. Supreme Court, in a 6 to 3 ruling citing stare decisis, upheld the half-century rule against royalty payments accruing after expiration of a patent. The Court’s decision in Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC is a...more

Supreme Court Upholds Precedent Prohibiting Post-Expiration Patent Royalties, but Leaves Open Parties' Options for Creative...

On June 22, 2015, the United States Supreme Court upheld the 50-year-old "Brulotte rule," which prohibits a patent owner from negotiating a license agreement that requires royalties to be paid after the expiration of the...more

Supreme Court Upholds Ban on Royalties after Licensed Patent Expires

In a 6-3 decision in Kimble v. Marvel, the U.S. Supreme Court refused to overturn the long-standing rule that bars a licensor from being able to collect royalties for sales after the expiration of the licensed patent—even if...more

Maintaining Trade Secret Confidentiality in Litigation

Early Monday morning you learn that Jane, your former employee, has stolen your company’s confidential information and her new employer is using it. You call your lawyer and tell her that you want to put Jane in jail. Your...more

Practice Considerations Post Kimble v. Marvel

The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent decision in Kimble et al. v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC, rejuvenates a 50-year old rule addressing patent royalties, bringing it to the forefront of patent and licensing practice. On June 22,...more

Intellectual Property Alert: Supreme Court Affirms Brulotte, “Green-Lights” Collecting Patent Royalties After Patents Expire

In an important decision for patent licensing freedom, on June 22, 2015, the United States Supreme Court cleared the way for spreading patent royalty payments after the expiration of patents, in some simple and other complex...more

U.S. Supreme Court Confirms That Post Patent Expiration Royalties Are Prohibited

Background of the Case - The dispute in Stephen Kimble v. Marvel Enterprises, Inc., Case No. 13-720, ___ U.S. ___ (2015), arose out of a 2001 settlement of a prior lawsuit between the parties. The prior suit had...more

Defendants’ Request For Stay Is Denied

The PTAB has not yet instituted the IPR petition. The deadline for decision on whether to institute the IPR petition is October 22, 2015. Delay in petitioning for IPR could create some tactical disadvantage to plaintiff and...more

Supreme Court Decides Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC

On June 22, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Kimble v. Marvel Entertainment, LLC, No. 13-720, declining to overrule Brulotte v. Thys Co., 379 U.S. 29 (1964), and holding that a contract transferring or licensing patent...more

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