Civil Rights Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Civil Procedure

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News & Analysis as of

Knowingly or Not? When Does an Employee Agree to Arbitrate?

There was a time, not so long ago, when federal courts refused to enforce arbitration agreements in Title VII cases, rendering arbitration agreements in the employment context virtually meaningless. Then, in 1991, Congress...more

Ninth Circuit Reinforces that Arbitration Agreements Will be Enforced

Ashbey was employed from December 1996 until November 2010, when he was discharged. He started with Archstone as a service technician and was promoted to regional service manager. In 2009, Ashbey signed a document titled,...more

Supreme Court Gives Conciliatory Nod to the EEOC’s Duty of Conciliation

In a unanimous decision issued on April 29, 2015, the United States Supreme Court has unequivocally allowed judicial review of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC)’s pre-litigation conciliation efforts, but...more

SCOTUS: EEOC Must Attempt Conciliation Before Filing Suit

On April 29, 2015, in Mach Mining, LLC v. EEOC, the U.S. Supreme Court held that courts have authority to review whether the EEOC fulfilled its obligation under Title VII to attempt conciliation before filing suit....more

EEOC Required to "Conciliate"—However It Sees Fit—Before Suing Employers

In a limited victory for employers, the Supreme Court held last week in Mach Mining, LLC v. EEOC that courts have jurisdiction to review whether the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission ("EEOC") fulfilled its statutory...more

EEOC Has a Limited Duty to Conciliate, Supreme Court Rules

Before filing suit against an employer, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has a duty to notify the employer of the claim and give the employer an opportunity to discuss the matter. But the EEOC has no duty to engage...more

Supreme Court’s Decision in Mach Mining Impacts Employers’ Approach to Conciliation with the EEOC

In a case that has implications for every employer and respondent on each charge in which the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) finds reasonable cause to support the allegations, the U.S. Supreme Court...more

Supreme Court Calls Out the EEOC for Arguing It Alone Can Determine Whether It Followed the Law

We suggested last year that if you felt paranoid that the federal agencies seemed out to get employers, perhaps it was not paranoia at all. The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) spate of recent lawsuits — or at...more

Is the EEOC Rushing Your Company to Court? SCOTUS Says Not So Fast

The U. S. Supreme Court unanimously ruled on April 29 that courts can review whether the EEOC has satisfied its obligation under Title VII to conciliate before running to court. Title VII dictates that when the EEOC believes...more

Unanimous Supreme Court Holds EEOC Must Conciliate

Title VII was passed with a strong bias toward voluntary, non-litigation methods of dispute resolution. Indeed, the statute requires that even when the EEOC has found probable cause, the Commission “shall endeavor to...more

Supreme Court Confirms EEOC Conciliation Efforts are Subject to Judicial Review

On April 29, 2015, in a unanimous decision, the U.S. Supreme Court resolved a circuit split in holding that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) attempts to conciliate a discrimination charge prior to filing a...more

Courts May Review the EEOC's Conciliation Efforts – Well, Sort Of

Title VII is clear: if the EEOC finds discrimination, it is supposed to "endeavor to eliminate [the] alleged unlawful employment practice by informal methods of conference, conciliation, and persuasion." 42 U.S.C. §...more

EEOC Must Fulfill Conciliation Requirement before Suing

The U.S. Supreme Court on April 30 released its opinion in Mach Mining, LLC v. EEOC, stating that federal courts had the authority to review whether the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) fulfilled its duty to...more

Supreme Court Holds that EEOC Conciliation Efforts are Subject to Judicial Review

Wednesday, the Supreme Court held that courts have the authority to review whether the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has fulfilled its statutory duty to attempt to conciliate charges of discrimination prior...more

Will Federal Courts Review the EEOC Conciliation Process?

Federal law authorizes the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to investigate claims of workplace discrimination and, in some instances, to sue an employer to rectify allegedly on-going discriminatory conduct. ...more

Supreme Court (Sort of) Allows Courts To Review EEOC Mediation Efforts

Wednesday, the Supreme Court unanimously held that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s statutory duty to conciliate to remedy a Title VII violation prior to filing a lawsuit on the violation is subject to some level...more

Supreme Court Refs Call Foul on EEOC, NBA Playoff Edition

The heads of officiating at the Supreme Court called a technical foul on the EEOC for being too Cavalier about its obligation to conciliate before lacing up its Converse All-Stars and heading to court. Mach Mining v. EEOC...more

Supreme Court Decides Mach Mining, LLC v. EEOC

On April 29, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court decided Mach Mining, LLC v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The Court held that the EEOC’s compliance with its statutory obligation to attempt to informally conciliate claims...more

Justices Give Courts Authority to Review EEOC Conciliation Efforts

On April 29, 2015, the Supreme Court of the United States decided whether—and the extent to which—courts may review efforts made by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) to resolve discrimination claims with...more

Supreme Court Concludes That EEOC Conciliation Efforts Are Reviewable by Courts

On April 29, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court unanimously concluded that the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s (EEOC) efforts to conciliate a matter before filing suit—a statutory requirement of Title VII—can be reviewed...more

First Circuit Reinstates Arbitral Award Despite Arbitration Panel’s Potentially Erroneous Conclusions

The First Circuit Court of Appeals recently reversed the district court’s vacatur ruling and remanded the matter for entry of an order confirming an arbitration award. While the First Circuit found that several of the...more

Will Employers Have an Affirmative Defense in EEOC Litigation? A Look at the Supreme Court’s Upcoming Decision

In the coming months, the Supreme Court of the United States will determine the level of judicial review, if any, that will be applied to employers’ pre-litigation negotiations with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity...more

Employment Law - February 2015

No Class Action Waivers on PAGA Claims: With Cert Denial, California’s Iskanian Decision Stands - Why it matters: It’s official: The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to review the California Supreme Court’s decision in...more

“Honest Belief” Defense Remains Unresolved In California

The California Supreme Court refused to decide whether the “honest belief” defense to discrimination and retaliation claims is valid under California law. Instead, in Richey v. Autonation, Inc., the Court punted on the...more

CAS decision addresses fairness and justice in sports disciplinary cases

The Court of Arbitration for Sport (“CAS”) decision in Dirk de Ridder v International Sailing Federation, recently published in full, has outlined six propositions to ensure that the disciplinary procedures operated by...more

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