9th Circuit to D.C. Circuit: We’ll see you in [The Supreme] Court!

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Yesterday, the US Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit cleared the way for the extortion case against Former Rep. Rick Renzi (R-Ariz.) to proceed to trial. In the process, they flatly disagreed with a 2007 Ruling by the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit on a US representative’s right to advance notice for search and seizure. Given this conflict between two appeals courts – on an issue that pits congressional privilege against efforts to prosecute public corruption, we predict the U.S. Supreme Court will ultimately hear this case and sort out the issues.

On June 23, 2011, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit squarely rejected arguments made by attorneys for former Rep. Rick Renzi (R-Ariz.) and held that an extortion case against Renzi can proceed to trial. Renzi had argued that the Constitution’s “speech or debate” clause shields him from prosecution because the allegedly corrupt acts he is charged with fall under the category of “legislative acts” that are protected by that clause.

As we wrote on this blog nearly a year ago, the indictment stems from a government land-swap deal that prosecutors say illegally benefited Renzi’s former business partner. Renzi allegedly used his seat in Congress to strong-arm people into land deals with the former partner, who then kicked back money to Renzi in complicated financial transactions.

The appeals court found that Supreme Court precedent compels the conclusion that allegedly corrupt acts by a legislator are not protected by the clause as “legislative acts.”

“Despite Renzi’s best efforts to convince us otherwise, we agree with the district court that the alleged choices and actions for which he is being prosecuted lie beyond those limits. We affirm the district court’s denial of relief on each of the issues properly raised on appeal,” the 9th Circuit held.

Please see full article below for more information.

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DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Jeff Ifrah | Attorney Advertising

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