An ArbitrationNation Roadmap: Document subpoenas to third parties

by Stinson Leonard Street - Arbitration Nation
Contact

[author: Liz Kramer]

This post is dedicated to a perennial favorite topic: subpoenas for documents in arbitration.  Why this topic and YLSgargoylenot something hot off the presses?  Because SCOTUS has not yet accepted or denied the cert petition in Sutter, and no cases have come out recently that meet my high standards for discussion on this blog (is it about arbitration?  does it lend itself to a fun title?  at least a fun photo?).

If the arbitration involves interstate commerce, the Federal Arbitration Act governs the issuance of subpoenas.  Section 7 authorizes an arbitrator to “summon in writing any person to attend before them or any of them as a witness and in a proper case to bring with him or them any book, record, document, or paper which may be deemed material as evidence in the case.”  9 U.S.C. § 7.  The section also specifies that if the recipient of the subpoena does not cooperate, the issuing party must bring a motion in the federal district court in “the district in which such arbitrators, or a majority of them, are sitting.”  Unlike all other court actions relating to arbitration, you do not need a separate, non-FAA basis for federal jurisdiction to enforce a Section 7 subpoena in federal court.  (If your arbitration does not involve interstate commerce, then the applicable state arbitration act will govern the availability of subpoenas.) 

The language of Section 7 has led to a circuit split on whether the FAA authorizes document discovery from third parties.  The plain text of the statute suggests that documents are only available if they are in the possession of a third-party witness who is testifying during the arbitration hearing (but not available in advance of the hearing without a testifying witness).  And, indeed, that is the interpretation that both the Second and Third Circuits have offered in recent years.  E.g., Life Receivables Trust v. Syndicate 102 of Lloyd’s of London, 549 F.3d 210 (2nd Cir. 2008); Hay Group, Inc. v. E.B.S. Acquisition Corp., 360 F.3d 404 (3d Cir.2004).   The Second Circuit characterized its decision as part of an “emerging rule” and a “growing consensus,” probably due in part to the fact that Justice Alito wrote the Hay Group opinion before joining the Supreme Court.

The only strong opposition comes from a  twelve year old decision from the Eighth Circuit, finding that if an arbitrator has the power to order a third-party to bring documents to a hearing, it must also have the power to order that the documents be produced in advance.  In re Arbitration Between Sec. Life Ins. Co. of Am., 228 F.3d 865, 870-71 (8th Cir.2000).  The Fourth Circuit struck out a middle ground, without the benefit of any of the previously-cited decisions, noting that arbitrators have the power to order third parties to produce documents in advance of the hearing only in cases of special need.  COMSAT Corp. v. Nat’l Sci. Found., 190 F.3d 269, 275 (4th Cir.1999). 

Of course, parties have found creative ways around the rule against pre-hearing discovery from third parties.  For example, arbitrators have conducted mini-hearings, in advance of the full hearing on the merits, for the sole purpose of hearing testimony and/or receiving documents from a third party.  See Alliance Healthcare Services, Inc. v. Argonaut Private Equity, LLC, 804 F. Supp. 2d 808 (N.D. Ill. 2011). 

Assuming the arbitrator has the power to subpoena a third party for documents in advance of the hearing, are there any limits on who those third parties can be?  In particular, can they be outside the state where the arbitration will occur, or more than 100 miles from the hearing site (the limitations in FRCP 45)?  Again, courts are split on whether the geographic limitations of Rule 45 apply in the arbitration context.  A number of courts find the limits do not apply.  E.g., In re Arbitration Between Sec. Life Ins. Co. of Am., 228 F.3d 865, 870-71 (8th Cir.2000); Festus & Helen Stacy Fdn. v. Merrill Lynch, 432 F. Supp. 2d 1375, 1378 (N.D. Ga. 2006).  Other courts hold that the geographic limitations apply equally to arbitration and court subpoenas.  E.g., Legion Ins. Co. v. John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Co., 2002 WL 537652, at *27–28 (3d Cir. April 11, 2002).   Finally, other courts get around the perceived unfairness of arbitration subpoenas being limited to third parties in a certain geographic radius by using FRCP 45(a)(3)(B) as a gap-filler of sorts, allowing for the issuance of third-party subpoenas outside the federal district where the arbitration hearing will proceed.  See Ferry Holding Corp. v. GIS Marine, LLC, 2012 WL 88196 (E.D. Mo. 2012).

In short, subpoenaing documents from third parties is an area where the law is in flux, so you want to reserve your requests for third parties whose documents are critical and merit the expense of fighting over whether they should be produced. The issuing party must check the precedent in the federal district where the arbitration hearing will take place to see if pre-hearing document discovery is allowed and whether it is restricted to the geographic limits of Rule 45.  If courts in the relevant district have limited the reach of subpoenas for documents, you will need to get creative to get your discovery.  For those who want to object to a subpoena for documents from an arbitrator, you can bring to bear all the usual objections under Rule 45, as well as the unique arbitration-related objections that document discovery from third parties is not available in arbitration.

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Stinson Leonard Street - Arbitration Nation | Attorney Advertising

Written by:

Stinson Leonard Street - Arbitration Nation
Contact
more
less

Stinson Leonard Street - Arbitration Nation on:

Readers' Choice 2017
Reporters on Deadline

"My best business intelligence, in one easy email…"

Your first step to building a free, personalized, morning email brief covering pertinent authors and topics on JD Supra:
Sign up using*

Already signed up? Log in here

*By using the service, you signify your acceptance of JD Supra's Privacy Policy.
Privacy Policy (Updated: October 8, 2015):
hide

JD Supra provides users with access to its legal industry publishing services (the "Service") through its website (the "Website") as well as through other sources. Our policies with regard to data collection and use of personal information of users of the Service, regardless of the manner in which users access the Service, and visitors to the Website are set forth in this statement ("Policy"). By using the Service, you signify your acceptance of this Policy.

Information Collection and Use by JD Supra

JD Supra collects users' names, companies, titles, e-mail address and industry. JD Supra also tracks the pages that users visit, logs IP addresses and aggregates non-personally identifiable user data and browser type. This data is gathered using cookies and other technologies.

The information and data collected is used to authenticate users and to send notifications relating to the Service, including email alerts to which users have subscribed; to manage the Service and Website, to improve the Service and to customize the user's experience. This information is also provided to the authors of the content to give them insight into their readership and help them to improve their content, so that it is most useful for our users.

JD Supra does not sell, rent or otherwise provide your details to third parties, other than to the authors of the content on JD Supra.

If you prefer not to enable cookies, you may change your browser settings to disable cookies; however, please note that rejecting cookies while visiting the Website may result in certain parts of the Website not operating correctly or as efficiently as if cookies were allowed.

Email Choice/Opt-out

Users who opt in to receive emails may choose to no longer receive e-mail updates and newsletters by selecting the "opt-out of future email" option in the email they receive from JD Supra or in their JD Supra account management screen.

Security

JD Supra takes reasonable precautions to insure that user information is kept private. We restrict access to user information to those individuals who reasonably need access to perform their job functions, such as our third party email service, customer service personnel and technical staff. However, please note that no method of transmitting or storing data is completely secure and we cannot guarantee the security of user information. Unauthorized entry or use, hardware or software failure, and other factors may compromise the security of user information at any time.

If you have reason to believe that your interaction with us is no longer secure, you must immediately notify us of the problem by contacting us at info@jdsupra.com. In the unlikely event that we believe that the security of your user information in our possession or control may have been compromised, we may seek to notify you of that development and, if so, will endeavor to do so as promptly as practicable under the circumstances.

Sharing and Disclosure of Information JD Supra Collects

Except as otherwise described in this privacy statement, JD Supra will not disclose personal information to any third party unless we believe that disclosure is necessary to: (1) comply with applicable laws; (2) respond to governmental inquiries or requests; (3) comply with valid legal process; (4) protect the rights, privacy, safety or property of JD Supra, users of the Service, Website visitors or the public; (5) permit us to pursue available remedies or limit the damages that we may sustain; and (6) enforce our Terms & Conditions of Use.

In the event there is a change in the corporate structure of JD Supra such as, but not limited to, merger, consolidation, sale, liquidation or transfer of substantial assets, JD Supra may, in its sole discretion, transfer, sell or assign information collected on and through the Service to one or more affiliated or unaffiliated third parties.

Links to Other Websites

This Website and the Service may contain links to other websites. The operator of such other websites may collect information about you, including through cookies or other technologies. If you are using the Service through the Website and link to another site, you will leave the Website and this Policy will not apply to your use of and activity on those other sites. We encourage you to read the legal notices posted on those sites, including their privacy policies. We shall have no responsibility or liability for your visitation to, and the data collection and use practices of, such other sites. This Policy applies solely to the information collected in connection with your use of this Website and does not apply to any practices conducted offline or in connection with any other websites.

Changes in Our Privacy Policy

We reserve the right to change this Policy at any time. Please refer to the date at the top of this page to determine when this Policy was last revised. Any changes to our privacy policy will become effective upon posting of the revised policy on the Website. By continuing to use the Service or Website following such changes, you will be deemed to have agreed to such changes. If you do not agree with the terms of this Policy, as it may be amended from time to time, in whole or part, please do not continue using the Service or the Website.

Contacting JD Supra

If you have any questions about this privacy statement, the practices of this site, your dealings with this Web site, or if you would like to change any of the information you have provided to us, please contact us at: info@jdsupra.com.

- hide
*With LinkedIn, you don't need to create a separate login to manage your free JD Supra account, and we can make suggestions based on your needs and interests. We will not post anything on LinkedIn in your name. Or, sign up using your email address.
Feedback? Tell us what you think of the new jdsupra.com!