Citizenship and Allegiance: Before and After the Fourteenth Amendment

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Before the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States, one was considered a citizen of a State as well as a citizen of the United States. As such, one owe allegiance to both the individual State government as well as the United States government.

After the ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment; in the Slaughterhouse Cases, it was held that citizenship of a State was separate and distinct from citizenship of the United States. That a citizen of a State was separate and distinct from a citizen of the United States. Now a citizen of a State owes allegiance to the individual State government while a citizen of the United States owes allegiance to the United States government.

A citizen of the United States, in addition, as a citizen of the United States and a citizen of a State, owes allegiance to the individual State government and the United States government. Quotes and cites to cases of the Supreme Court of the United States included.

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