Copyright Doe Defendant Can’t Quash Disclosure Subpoena Anonymously—Hard Drive Productions v. Does

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D.C. magistrate holds in copyright file-sharing case that IP address owners may no longer anonymously file motions to quash disclosure subpoenas. By filing motions on the public docket, the defendants' subscriber information will be available to the plaintiffs seeking identity discovery, vitiating the owners' due process rights.

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Published In: Art, Entertainment & Sports Updates, Constitutional Law Updates, Intellectual Property Updates, Privacy Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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