Court Nixes Non-Appealability Clause in Arbitration Agreement

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Generally speaking, arbitration is a matter of contract, and arbitration agreements must be enforced according to their terms. The Ninth Circuit recently issued a caveat, however. In In re Wal-Mart Wage & Hour Employment Practices Litigation, No. 11-17718 (9th Cir. Dec. 17, 2013), an issue of first impression, the Ninth Circuit held that a non-appealability clause in an arbitration agreement that eliminates all federal court review of arbitration awards, including review under § 10 of the Federal Arbitration Act, is not enforceable. Federal court review of arbitration awards is already limited to the grounds enumerated in the FAA and to very limited circumstances in which an arbitrator manifestly disregards the law. Allowing parties to contractually eliminate all judicial review of arbitration awards, the court stated, would disregard the text of the FAA and take away the assurance of a minimum level of due process for the parties. This case shows that, while courts do strongly favor enforcing arbitration agreements according to their terms, there are still limits on the terms to which parties can agree.

Topics:  Appeals, Arbitration, Arbitration Agreements, Federal Arbitration Act, Void and Unenforceable

Published In: Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) Updates, Labor & Employment Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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