Defect Allegations Insufficient in Drug Case

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We may be accustomed to talking about whether a product was "defective" and, as counsel for defendant sellers, working hard to show that the product contained no "defect." Earlier this month came a decision reminding us that, in some contexts, a defect, even one that caused the injury, may not be all plaintiffs need to allege and prove. Mills v. Bristol-Myers Squibb Co., No. 11-00968 (D. Ariz., 10/7/11).

Plaintiff was prescribed Clopidogrel (branded as "Plavix") for the treatment of peripheral vascular disease. Two years later, plaintiff initiated this action alleging that the drug caused excessive rectal bleeding. The court dismissed, and plaintiff eventually sought leave to file a Second Amended Complaint. Defendants argued that leave to amend should be denied as futile. And the court agreed.

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