Disgruntled Employee Lacked Criminal Intent to Be Sued for a Civil Violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act While the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act ("CFAA") permits seven causes of action

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While the federal Computer Fraud and Abuse Act (“CFAA”) permits seven causes of action to be brought by individuals or companies who have been victims of violations of the statute, practitioners lose sight of the fact that the CFAA is at its core a criminal statute. Nyack Hospital v. Moran, 2010 WL 4118355 (S.D.N.Y. June 1, 2010) neatly illustrates the importance of being able to prove the criminal elements of the statute in order to obtain a civil remedy – damages or injunctive relief.

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Published In: Civil Remedies Updates, Criminal Law Updates, Labor & Employment Updates, Intellectual Property Updates, Science, Computers & Technology Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Nick Akerman, Dorsey & Whitney LLP | Attorney Advertising

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