Diversity of Citizenship and a Citizen of a State who is not a Citizen of the United States

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In my work “Diversity of Citizenship includes a Citizen of a State who is not a Citizen of the United States”, I showed in the case of Bible Society v. Grove (101 U.S. 610, 1879); cited in Young v. Parker’s Administrator (132 U.S. 267, 1889), that since the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment and the Slaughterhouse Cases, a citizen of a State (who is not a citizen of the United States) under Article IV, Section 2, Clause 1 of the Constitution of the United States of America, is still recognized in diversity of citizenship suits, in particular in cases which are removed from the state level to the federal level.

In this work I show that one who is a citizen of the United States and a citizen of a State (Fourteenth Amendment), as well as one who is a citizen of a State who is not a citizen of the United States (Article IV, Section 2, Clause 1 of the Constitution), has the requisite citizenship to give a circuit court of the United States jurisdiction in a diversity of citizenship suit. The cases of Bondurant v. Watson (103 U.S. 281, 1880) and Sun Printing & Publishing Association v. Edwards (194 U.S. 33, 1904) are provided for this purpose.

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