Early conciliation: what does it mean for employers?

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Gurpreet Duhra, partner in our Sheffield office comments: Early conciliation (EC) has been available to claimants since 6 April 2014 but will be mandatory in respect of claims presented on or after 6 May 2014. Whilst employers could be forgiven for assuming that EC will have limited impact, particularly given the significant decline in claims since the introduction of fees, it is important that managers are prepared for the initial call from Acas to avoid prejudicing the employer’s position in any subsequent negotiations or litigation.

The mandatory EC procedure involves four steps:

Step 1: A prospective claimant who wants to institute relevant proceedings must provide prescribed information to Acas either by completing the EC form online or by telephoning Acas.

Step 2: An early conciliation support officer (ECSO) will make initial contact with the prospective claimant. The ECSO will explain the EC process, take some details from the prospective claimant and check that they wish to proceed with conciliation. As long as they do, the prospective claimant’s information will be sent to a Concilation Officer (CO).

Step 3: The CO will then contact the prospective respondent and enquire whether the prospective respondent is willing to participate in EC. If so, the CO must try to promote a settlement between the parties within the EC period of one calendar month from the date on which the prospective claimant made initial contact with Acas. The EC period may be extended once, by up to 14 days, if the CO believes settlement may be imminent.

An EC certificate must be issued where:

  • It is not possible to contact the parties;
  • The parties do not wish to participate in EC;
  • Settlement is not achieved within the prescribed period; or
  • The CO considers that settlement is not possible.  

The EC certificate will give the prospective claimant a unique reference number which they will have to include on their ET1 should they go on to present a claim. Without that reference number, the tribunal will reject the claim (except in the minority of cases where EC is not required).

What is the impact on employers?

There is no requirement on either party to engage with conciliation. If either the claimant or the respondent does not want to enter into discussions, the CO will simply issue the EC certificate. In many cases employers may consider that there is little incentive to enter into settlement negotiations until the employee has paid a fee to institute tribunal proceedings. However, there are potential benefits of settling a claim early, particularly where the claimant is unrepresented.

Employers should bear in mind the following considerations:

Do managers need training? A line manager may be the first contact that Acas makes with the employer. It is vital that anyone within the organisation who is contacted by Acas about an employment dispute understands the importance of dealing with the initial contact properly. The informal approach from Acas should be treated as seriously as employers would take a formal legal communication regarding a potential claim. Ensure that any managers who may be the initial recipient of the Acas call are aware of their responsibilities.  The initial recipient of the call should also be reminded to keep the issue confidential and not to discuss the details of the dispute with anyone else;

Give managers clear guidance on who will deal with EC. It is important that the individual who receives first contact from Acas about EC passes the details of the dispute on to whoever has responsibility for managing any subsequent tribunal claim. Individuals without appropriate authority and training should not attempt to resolve the issue themselves. Acas is allowing some larger organisations to register a national contact for the purposes of EC. For more information contact ECcontacts@acas.org.uk;

Do not discount the option of settlement without first considering the merits. An unreasonable rejection of the possibility of settlement discussions could potentially lead to cost implications in the future. Relevant factors when assessing the merits of conciliation include: the likely strength and value of the claim; the potential legal costs and management time of defending a claim; the ease with which the issue could be resolved informally; and any damage to the organisation’s reputation that could result from lengthy and public tribunal proceedings;

Obtain as much information on the allegations from Acas as possible to make an informed assessment of whether the claim has any merits. Early investigation of the background to the allegations will also assist the organisation to respond comprehensively and accurately if the claimant does put in an ET1; 

Do not feel that you have to respond to all allegations immediately. Take time to consider your position before responding on allegations made and if necessary take legal advice on next steps including:

  • How to obtain further information on the allegations to allow you to determine the merits of any potential case;
  • The timing of any settlement and whether settlement is appropriate before a claim has been issued. As a result of the new fee regime, claimants are likely to want to explore settlement before issuing a claim whereas respondents are more likely to favour a ‘wait and see’ approach in order to see if a claimant is serious enough about their case to ‘put their money where their mouth is’. However, early settlements can be cheaper for employers and positions may become more entrenched once the fee has been paid;
  • The terms and nature of any settlement package offered.

Mark any internal correspondence regarding potential settlement as “without prejudice” to try and avoid it being disclosable in any future tribunal proceedings. Anything communicated to an Acas officer in connection with the performance of their functions is not admissible in evidence in tribunal proceedings unless the person who communicated it to the officer gives their consent.

Ensure that no one in the organisation reacts to contact from Acas by taking negative action against the worker(s) or employee(s) concerned eg refusing to give a reference. Depending on the type of allegations raised, this could lead to further claims (e.g. victimisation or whistleblowing).

Calculate the time limit: the EC regime includes a complicated process for recalculating the time limit for presenting the claim. The time limit is extended by the period between ‘Day A’ when the claimant contacts Acas, and ‘Day B’ when the EC certificate is deemed to have been issued, but may be extended further if this results in there being less than a month between Day B and the time limit expiring. There is significant potential for error and if the claimant fails to present the claim in time, the employer may be able to challenge its acceptance by the tribunal.

Ultimately in many cases employers may consider that there is little value in engaging in early conciliation. However, following the guidelines outlined above may prevent that decision from backfiring and creating increased legal risk for the employer.

Topics:  Employee Rights, Employer Liability Issues, UK

Published In: Civil Procedure Updates, Labor & Employment Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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