Field Services Introduce Compliance Concerns

more+
less-

With the ever-rising tide of residential foreclosures, banks are turning to field service companies to protect their real estate assets pending sale. Field service companies include all manner of vendors, ranging from inspectors to landscapers, locksmiths, contractors, and trash removers. Some field service companies are large national vendors and others are mom-and-pop operations, and new firms are entering the market in record numbers. The use of third party contractors for property preservation and maintenance tasks brings with it the prospect of liability for the mortgagee based on claims of trespass, harassment, or injury. While the lender's contract with its vendor can help mitigate the possible liabilities, it is unlikely to completely eliminate that risk.

Lenders can take several proactive steps to protect themselves against vicarious liability, including thorough vetting of their vendors and regular quality control reviews of their performance. Moreover, lenders should take a prudent approach toward managing the cost of field services, because homeowners in default ultimately pay the costs of these services despite having no opportunity to shop for providers. State and federal consumer protection agencies may scrutinize costs that appear excessive based on consumer complaints, particularly if the lender and service providers are affiliated.

The author's article on the hidden risks in use of field service providers concludes with a series of practical steps lenders can use to minimize their risk while aiding the recovery of loan proceeds and protecting REO assets.

This article first appeared in "Servicing Management" magazine (July 2010) and is reprinted with permission.

LOADING PDF: If there are any problems, click here to download the file.

Published In: Consumer Protection Updates, Finance & Banking Updates, Residential Real Estate Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© BuckleySandler LLP | Attorney Advertising

Don't miss a thing! Build a custom news brief:

Read fresh new writing on compliance, cybersecurity, Dodd-Frank, whistleblowers, social media, hiring & firing, patent reform, the NLRB, Obamacare, the SEC…

…or whatever matters the most to you. Follow authors, firms, and topics on JD Supra.

Create your news brief now - it's free and easy »