May 24 (Bloomberg Law) -- Under current intellectual property law, a consumer who unlocks his or her own cellphone can be convicted as a felon. Law professor and Instapundit founder Glenn Reynolds says such a scenario is evidence of how far U.S. intellectual property laws have moved away from their original purpose, giving large corporations tremendous power at the cost of consumer rights. "They give [corporations] way too much...intellectual property laws were actually written as a way of cutting back on monopolies, not granting See more +
May 24 (Bloomberg Law) -- Under current intellectual property law, a consumer who unlocks his or her own cellphone can be convicted as a felon. Law professor and Instapundit founder Glenn Reynolds says such a scenario is evidence of how far U.S. intellectual property laws have moved away from their original purpose, giving large corporations tremendous power at the cost of consumer rights. "They give [corporations] way too much...intellectual property laws were actually written as a way of cutting back on monopolies, not granting bigger ones," he says.

Additionally, Reynolds says these burdens cause broader systemic harm, as the current intellectual property regime makes it difficult for individuals to come up with innovative, economically productive ideas. "There's just a thicket of intellectual property problems that people have to get through to bring new products to market now and that's very destructive," he says. See less -

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Topics:  Anti-Competitive, Cell Phones, Copyright, Copyright Term Extension, DMCA, Economic Damages, First Sale Doctrine, Inventors, Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Monopolization, Patent Wars, Patents, Richard Posner, Royalties, SCOTUS, Software, Unlocked Devices

Published In: Communications & Media Updates, Consumer Protection Updates, Elections & Politics Updates, Intellectual Property Updates, Science, Computers & Technology Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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