Is There Such a Thing as a Simple Bankruptcy in Arizona?

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Explore:  Trustees

Bankruptcy in Arizona Is bankruptcy a simple process here in Arizona? Depends.  Often when I meet with people they will tell me that they have a very easy bankruptcy case for me.  Over the years my experience has taught me to become skeptical – because rarely is there such a thing as an easy bankruptcy.

Some bankruptcy cases are definitely more complex than others, but all bankruptcy cases have issues that must be addressed in order for the process to go smoothly.

Not only that but each bankruptcy cases is assigned a trustee.  In Arizona there are twenty-one (21) chapter 7 bankruptcy trustees.  While all of them are guided by the bankruptcy code, they each run their own individual office and have their own way of doing things.  This means that different issues could arise if your case is assigned to one trustee as opposed to another trustee.

Sometimes the random assignment of a trustee can have a huge impact on how smoothly your bankruptcy case goes.

Having a bankruptcy attorney on your side can make a difficult bankruptcy case seem simple.  Knowing what issues to look for before your case is filed is vitally important.  Once your case is filed with the bankruptcy court there may be no looking back.

It is also possible to turn what should be a simple bankruptcy into a painfully complex one.  This most often happens when a client fails to disclose an asset or a financial transaction to their attorney.

In order to provide you with best legal advice, your bankruptcy attorney must know all the facts.  A missing fact here and there can complete change the legal advice you get.  And that could mean big trouble for your case.

There can be simple bankruptcy cases here in Arizona.  But they don’t always start out that way.

 

Topics:  Trustees

Published In: Bankruptcy Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© John Skiba, Skiba Law Group, PLC | Attorney Advertising

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