Limiting E-Discovery in Intellectual Property Litigation: The International Trade Commission Follows a Warmly Welcomed Trend

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Pryor Cashman Partner James Klaiber, a member of the firm's Intellectual Property Group, and Associate Leighton Dellinger have written an article discussing the sources of e-discovery costs and what the International Trade Commission and other litigation forums are doing to contain them. The article, entitled "Limiting E-Discovery in Intellectual Property Litigation: The International Trade Commission Follows a Warmly Welcomed Trend," was published in the December 14, 2012 edition of the BNA Patent, Trademark & Copyright Journal.

On October 2, 2012, the International Trade Commission, which is charged with investigating claims of unfair competition based on intellectual property infringement, proposed rules that would limit electronic discovery in patent infringement investigations conducted by the Commission. Intended to bring down the cost of intellectual property litigation, these proposed rules represent the most recent measure in a broad federal campaign to limit e-discovery costs.

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Published In: Intellectual Property Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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