Mandatory Debarment for FCPA Violations? A Bad Idea Whose Time Should Never Come

In the fervor of the U.S.'s current anti-foreign-corruption efforts, a particularly misguided proposal has occasionally reared its ugly head: Requiring “mandatory debarment” for any company that violates the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”).

On the merits, such a proposal is completely wrong-headed. Debarment is a severe, forward-looking administrative remedy – the corporate “death penalty” – not a vehicle to “boost” the penalties for past criminal FCPA violations.

Nonetheless, in 2010, such a “mandatory debarment” bill was passed by the House, only to die in Congress due to Senate inaction. Optimistic multinational contractors might therefore have concluded, “Whew, we dodged that bullet.”

However, a recent law-review article has sought to resurrect the debarment idea, contending that no other remedy will deter large global companies from violating the FCPA.

Please see full article below for more information.

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Published In: Administrative Agency Updates, Business Organization Updates, Criminal Law Updates, Finance & Banking Updates, International Trade Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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