Ninth Circuit: What Happens When the Plaintiff is not a Plan “Participant”? Move to Dismiss for Lack of Subject Matter Jurisdiction? Think Again.

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Courts had dismissed ERISA cases for lack of subject matter jurisdiction when the plaintiff was not a plan “participant, beneficiary or fiduciary.” Harris v. Provident Life Accident Ins. Co., 26 F.3d 930, 934 (9th Cir. 1994).

Not any more in the Ninth Circuit. The issue is now merely an element of the ERISA case. Rather than a subject matter motion, attorneys in the Ninth Circuit are advised to fashion their motions to dismiss as a “failure to state a claim.”

Here’s the case of Leeson v Transamerica Disability Income Plan, __F.3d__ (9th Cir. January 23, 2012) ( “The issue of participant status goes to the merits of the claim and not to the subject matter jurisdiction of the district court.”)(Overrules prior Ninth Circuit precedent including Curtis v. Nevada Bonding Corp. (9th Cir. 1995) 53 F. 3d 1023, 1027)).

Please see full article below for more information.

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Published In: Civil Procedure Updates, Finance & Banking Updates, Labor & Employment Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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