Proposed New Rules for In-Bond Transportation of Imports and Opportunity to Submit Comments

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On February 22, 2012, U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking that proposes changes to regulations affecting in-bond transportation of imported merchandise. The Notice can be accessed at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-02-22/html/2012- 2819.htm. The Notice invites comments on the proposed changes. The deadline for such comments is April 23, 2012.

Under existing CBP regulations, imported goods may arrive at one U.S. port of entry and then be transported by a bonded carrier to another U.S. port of entry without the merchandise being appraised or assessed duties. Such “inbond movement” requires the filing of a transportation entry (CBP Form 7512) that documents the movement of the goods and payment of a bond, which has subsidiary requirements pertaining to receipt, safekeeping, and disposition of the bonded merchandise. Following in-bond shipment, the goods may then be either exported or entered officially into the United States with duties paid at the destination port.

The different types of in-bond transportation are (1) Immediate Transportation (IT), (2) Transportation and Exportation (T&E), and Immediate Exportation (IE). An IT entry allows merchandise, upon its arrival at a U.S. port, to be transported to another U.S. port, where the merchandise is then entered into the United States. A T&E entry allows merchandise to be entered at a U.S. port for transit through the United States to another U. S. port, where the merchandise is exported without the payment of duties. An IE entry allows cargo that has arrived at a U.S. port to be immediately exported from that same port without the payment of duties.

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Published In: Administrative Agency Updates, General Business Updates, International Trade Updates, Transportation Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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