Recent Pennsylvania Superior Court Decision Highlights Importance of Objections to Preserving Issues for Appellate Review

more+
less-

The Superior Court recently held that an attorney’s failure to make timely or effective objections to the composition of a jury prevented a trial court from vacating a judgment and granting a mistrial. The Superior Court’s April 16, 2013 decision in Webber v. Ford Motor Co. is not precedential, but it bears attention because it demonstrates the need for trial counsel to be aware of potential appellate issues and to lodge proper objections in a timely fashion to preserve those issues for review.

Plaintiff George Webber and his wife sued several automotive brake product manufacturers after Mr. Webber was diagnosed with peritoneal mesothelioma. At the end of a five-week trial before eight jurors and one alternate, defense counsel proposed that the alternate juror participate in deliberations as a ninth juror, and plaintiffs’ counsel indicated that he did not object.

Please see full alert below for more information.

LOADING PDF: If there are any problems, click here to download the file.


DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP | Attorney Advertising

Written by:

more+
less-

Schnader Harrison Segal & Lewis LLP on:

Reporters on Deadline

"My best business intelligence, in one easy email…"

Your first step to building a free, personalized, morning email brief covering pertinent authors and topics on JD Supra:

Sign up to create your digest using LinkedIn*

*With LinkedIn, you don't need to create a separate login to manage your free JD Supra account, and we can make suggestions based on your needs and interests. We will not post anything on LinkedIn in your name. Or, sign up using your email address.
×
Loading...
×
×