It's a scattershot collection of sentencing remands in this week's short wins.

Also, Happy Belated President's Day everyone, or, as OPM says, happy Washington's Birthday:

This holiday is designated as "Washington's Birthday" in section 6103(a) of title 5 of the United States Code, which is the law that specifies holidays for Federal employees. Though other institutions such as state and local governments and private businesses may use other names, it is our policy to always refer to holidays by the names designated in the law.

Used car dealers with their "President's Day Sales" may differ though.

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Battle, Tenth Circuit: Appellant was convicted of conspiracy to possess with an intent to distribute 50 grams or more of crack. He was sentenced to 360 months in prison, and was later resentenced to 324 months after he filed a motion to reduce his sentence based on the retroactive amendment of the crack cocaine guidelines. The 324-month sentence was based in part on the court's finding that appellant was responsible for more than 3.4 kilograms of crack. Because the record did not support attributing this amount to appellant, the court reversed and remanded for resentencing.

2. United States v. Epps, D.C. Circuit: Appellant was convicted of various drug offenses under a Rule 11(c)(1)(C) plea agreement. He was sentenced to 188 months in prison followed by five years of supervised release. The court had jurisdiction to hear the appeal notwithstanding appellant's release from prison and the start of his supervised release. The appeal was not moot because appellant's term of supervised release may be impacted by the outcome of the appeal. Finally, appellant was entitled to a reduction of his sentence under the revised guidelines. For these reasons, the case was reversed and remanded.

3. United States v. May, Ninth Circuit: Appellants pled guilty to receipt of stolen mail and mail theft. The court's loss calculation included expenses the U.S. Postal Service ("USPS") incurred to avert future thefts. The court improperly ordered restitution for USPS' expenses because the mail theft of which the defendants were convicted occurred after, and could not have caused, USPS' delivery procedure change. As a result, the portion of the restitution order awarding restitution for USPS' expenses was vacated.

4. United States v. Patrick, Seventh Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to sex trafficking and was sentenced to 360 months in prison, to be served consecutive to a 20-year state court sentence appellant was serving. Because the court failed to discuss appellant's cooperation with authorities, appellant's sentence was vacated and the case remanded for further proceedings.

5. United States v. Capers, et al., Eleventh Circuit: Bishop Capers, Leon Frederick, and Larry Little were convicted of conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine and crack cocaine. The court ruled that the Fair Sentencing Act, which reduced the guidelines ranges for the offenses at issue, did not apply to Mr. Capers and Mr. Little's sentencing guidelines calculations because their offenses were committed before the Act was passed. This was error. Consequently, Mr. Capers and Mr. Little's sentences were vacated and the case remanded for resentencing.

If you'd like to speak with us, please call (202) 640-2850. Odds are we'd love to talk to you.

Topics:  Conspiracies, Drug Distribution, Fair Sentencing Act, Illegal Drugs, Mail Theft, Resentencing, Sentencing, Sex Trafficking, USPS

Published In: Criminal Law Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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