Short Wins - Special Assessment Lawyering And A Remand For The Oral Pronouncement Of A Special Condition Of Supervised Release

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There are some dramatic wins in the federal appeals courts. Sometimes an entire conviction is overturned, and it is clear that the person will walk free. Other times, a large and unjust sentence is reversed.

And then there are this week's "wins". In one, a former judge, convicted of fraud, will have the total punishment imposed on him reduced by $100 - the cost of the Special Assessment that was imposed on a count that exceeded the statute of limitations.

In another, the district court imposed a condition of supervised release ordering treatment for a gambling addiction in the Judgment following the sentencing hearing, but not at the hearing itself. So the case will go back for a sentencing hearing where the judge can say that the person is going to be going to treatment for gambling addiction to the person's face.

To the victories?

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Ciavarella, Third Circuit: Appellant, a former judge, was convicted of honest services mail fraud, among other offenses, and sentenced 336 months in prison and ordered to pay a special assessment and restitution. Because the mail fraud count was barred by the statute of limitations, and because appellant did not waive his challenge to this count on that ground, his conviction on this count was vacated. Remand was required to amend the judgment to reduce the special assessment.

2. United States v. Martin, Sixth Circuit: Appellant was sentenced to 120 months for being a felon in possession of a firearm. In the written judgment, the court imposed a special condition of supervised release that appellant undergo treatment for a gambling addiction. The government conceded that the court's failure to orally impose the condition was an abuse of discretion and requested remand for the court to conform its written judgment to the oral pronouncement. The appeals court granted that relief.

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