Short Wins - The BOP Makes Prison Harder For Women, And Blog Lobbying

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It's a bit of a sleepy week in the circuits, but not too sleepy in the news.

BOP Coverts Danbury to a Men's Prison

In Slate, Yale law professor Judith Resnik wrote about the problems facing female inmates in the Bureau of Prisons (hat tip to Todd Bussert's BOP Blog).

The BOP is converting Danbury to an all-male facility (Danbury is, of course, where Piper Kerman of "Orange is the New Black" fame did her time). This despite years of lobbying to open up more prisons for women closer to where their families are in the Northeast. It'll be harder for lawyers to see their clients, clients to get seen by their lawyers, and women to have visits from their children.

This is not good.

Also, if you're worried about the plight of women in BOP custody, here's a great nonprofit to get involved with.

ABA Blog Voting Time

Unrelatedly, it's now time for folks who are fans of this blog to let the ABA Journal know. I'd be grateful for any props. Here's the link.

Short Wins

To the victories!

1155650_berlin_siegessule.jpg1. United States v. Flores-Cordero, Ninth Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to illegal reentry and, at sentencing, a 16-level increase was added to his base offense level based on his prior state conviction for resisting arrest. Because appellant's prior conviction did not constitute a "crime of violence" under U.S.S.G. § 2L1.2, the sentence was vacated and the case remanded for resentencing.

2. United States v. Hogg, Sixth Circuit: Appellant pled guilty to possession with intent to distribute crack and was sentenced to 188 months in prison after two motions to withdraw his plea were denied. Before he was sentenced, the Fair Sentencing Act was passed, enacting more lenient penalties for crack offenses. At his sentencing, the law provided that courts should look to the penalty provisions in effect when the person committed the offense - not to the lesser penalties in the Act. The Supreme Court changed that after appellant was sentenced, ruling that people sentenced after the Act's enactment are entitled to the more lenient penalties. Because the district court and counsel did not correctly anticipate the potential impact of the Act on appellant's sentence (because they were not clairvoyant), appellant was given incorrect advice at his plea hearing. As a result, he should have been permitted to with draw his plea. The case was reversed and remanded.

3. United States v. Juncal, Second Circuit: Appellants were convicted of conspiracy to commit mail and wire fraud arising out of a scheme to obtain a $3 billion loan to finance the construction of a pipeline across Siberia. Appellants were sentenced to twenty years in prison. Because of procedural errors in appellants' sentencing, including the court's failure to weigh the 18 U.S.C. § 3553(a) factors, the cases were remanded for resentencing.

About This Blog

The Federal Criminal Appeals Blog is published by The Kaiser Law Firm PLLC in Washington, DC. The Kaiser Law Firm represents people who have been charged with federal crimes, are under federal investigation, or have a federal criminal appeal.

If you'd like to speak with us, please call (202) 640-2850. Odds are we'd love to talk to you.