Sprint Gets a Wallop of a Reminder – Company-Specific Do Not Call Lists Still Matter – $7.5 Million Record Do Not Call Consent Decree

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Yesterday, the Federal Communications Commission (“FCC”) announced a consent decree with Sprint Corporation for federal do not call violations. Specifically, under the terms of the agreement, Sprint will make a $7.5 million “voluntary contribution” to the United States Treasury.  This payment represents the largest do not call settlement reached by the FCC.  Sprint also agreed to various ongoing compliance initiatives, including enhanced training and reporting requirements.  Importantly, the action also serves as an important reminder on an often overlooked section of the do not call rules – the requirement that companies maintain and abide by “company-specific” or internal do not call lists.

Under the federal do not call rules, organizations making telemarketing calls to residential customers (including mobile phones) are required to scrub the federal do not call database before initiating those calls, unless the calls meet certain exceptions – the called party has an existing business relationship (“EBR”) with the caller or has provided prior express consent for the calls or the call is from a tax-exempt non-profit.  Of course, as we have written before, there are additional requirements for autodialed or prerecorded calls to mobile mobiles and prerecorded telemarketing calls to residential lines.

Another, sometimes overlooked requirement is that companies making permissible calls (for instance, after scrubbing the do not call database or with an existing business relationship or prior express consent) must maintain an internal, company-specific do not call list where companies log individuals’ subsequent requests not to be called.  In other words, even if a consumer has an existing business relationship or has given prior express consent to be called, once the consumer tells the company not to call again, that request trumps the existing business relationship/prior consent or the do not call scrub.  This company-specific do not call request must be implemented within 30 days and  honored for five years from the date the consumer made the request.  (The federal do not call registration, in contrast, lasts indefinitely).  A company must also have a do not call policy, available upon request.

In 2009, the FCC investigated Sprint for do not call violations relating to the company-specific do not call list.  Sprint subsequently settled that enforcement action in 2011 through a consent decree (which included a $ 400,000 payment).  The decree required Sprint to report to the FCC’s Enforcement Bureau, for two years, any noncompliance with the consent decree or the FCC’s company-specific do not call rules.

In March 2012, Sprint disclosed to the FCC that it had discovered additional issues involving human error and technical malfunctions relating to Sprint’s or its vendor’s do not call processes that caused potential noncompliance with consumers’ do not call or do not text preferences, or prevented the timely capture of the preferences.  Sprint represented that it had subsequently implemented improvements in its do not call data management systems.  It had also ceased telemarketing and text campaigns to investigate the issues.  The FCC investigated Sprint’s do not call compliance and ultimately entered into this record-setting $7.5 million settlement.

Under the terms of the consent decree, in addition to the settlement payment, Sprint will designate a Compliance Officer to administer a new compliance plan and to comply with the consent decree.  Sprint also must implement a compliance manual which will instruct “covered personnel” (including Sprint personnel and independent contractors who provide telemarketing services for Sprint) on Sprint’s do not call policies.  The consent decree further requires Sprint to establish and maintain an annual compliance training program, and to file several compliance reports with the FCC at designated time frames.  Significantly, Sprint acknowledges that actions or inactions of any independent contractors, subcontractors, or agents that result in a violation of the company-specific do not call rules or the consent constitute an act or inaction by Sprint – in other words, Sprint is specifically on the hook for third parties’ actions.

The consent decree and $7.5 million payment serve as a useful reminder of the company-specific do not call rules.  Once a consumer indicates they do not wish to receive further telemarketing calls or texts, the FCC’s rules require that the telemarketer place that consumer on its internal, company-specific do not call list.  This consumer requests trumps even an established business relationship or prior express consent.  It can only be revoked by subsequent express consent – which we would recommend be in writing.  Even if a consumer does business with your company every day, if he or she has asked not to receive telemarketing calls – don’t call!  Compliance with the company-specific do not call rule means your organization does not call someone who has indicated they do not want to be called.  And, it can also save your company great time, resources, and money spent defending private litigation or an FCC enforcement action.  Further, if your organization utilizes third parties for telemarketing campaigns, your company should make sure the third party is taking do not call requests, logging them, and passing those to your company for future campaigns.

 

Topics:  Consent Decrees, Do Not Call List, FCC, Non-Judicial Settlement Agreements, Sprint, Telecommunications, U.S. Treasury

Published In: Communications & Media Updates, Consumer Protection Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Jeff Ifrah | Attorney Advertising

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