Suit Against FTC Asks: Did Agency Change Advertising Rules in Middle of Game?

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Is there a way to hold a government agency like the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) accountable for the cost to businesses of what a company says are abrupt and systemic changes in regulatory standards? POM Wonderful LLC, a Los Angeles-based juice company, is trying to do just that by suing the FTC in District Court.

The FTC is reportedly investigating POM for alleged false advertising but hasn’t filed a complaint against the company. POM claims in its own lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in the District of Columbia, that the agency is already inventing new deceptive-advertising law on its own – without going through the required rule-making procedures — and is getting ready to enforce it against POM.

Specifically, POM says the FTC is now requiring that advertisers obtain prior approval by the Food and Drug Administration before making claims that a product treats or prevents disease and that they must have two well-controlled studies before making non-disease claims.

POM alleges that the FTC has put out these new, obligatory advertising standards for the entire food industry not by going through formal rule-making that would give the industry a chance to have input, but simply by publishing consent orders that it entered into with Nestle U.S.A. and Iovate Health Sciences, Inc. POM says the FTC gave POM copies of these consent orders and told POM that these standards now have the force of law and delineate the “new definition of deception.” POM says this action flies in the face of 20 years of FTC rules and regulations on food advertising.

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Published In: Administrative Agency Updates, Antitrust & Trade Regulation Updates, Communications & Media Updates, Constitutional Law Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Jeff Ifrah | Attorney Advertising

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