Terminating Your Contract: Things to Remember Part 2

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Let’s continue the discussion on issues to consider with regard to the termination of your contract.  Most  contracts have provisions governing what will constitute a breach or default and what the parties’ respective rights and obligations are in the event the contract is terminated for such breach or default (“termination for cause”).

 Right to Cure

It is common in termination for cause provisions for the terminating party to allow the defaulting party to have a period in which to correct the default.  This is typically called a “cure period.”  Determining  a reasonable cure period is dependent on the subject matter of the contract, the nature of the default and the parties’ respective bargaining powers.  For example, if a party defaults in a service obligation under a contract, the provision may state that the defaulting party has ten (10) days to re-perform the service in accordance with the contract before the terminating party may officially terminate the contract.

 Notice

One element of having the right to cure a default before the other party may terminate the contract is the concept of notice.  Notice is important because it is a means by which the parties communicate to each other what is deficient or lacking in the other’s performance.  Without adequate notice of what the breach or default is, it is difficult or impossible for the defaulting party to take full advantage of the cure period.  

Contracts typically have provisions stating when and how a party must notify the other of a default.   The notice period is usually congruent with the cure period, such that the terminating party must provide a certain amount of prior notice of the default, coupled with providing the defaulting party the opportunity to cure the default, before the termination right is triggered.

There are other matters to consider when dealing with termination issues, and these are just a few which pertain to termination for default.  If you’re in the process of terminating or drafting a contract, please contact an attorney to discuss the particular termination issues that may be encountered in regard to your deal.


DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Chambliss, Bahner & Stophel, P.C. | Attorney Advertising

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