Types of Workers’ Compensation Benefits in Pennsylvania

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Explore:  Workplace Injury

In Pennsylvania, workers’ compensation is intended to help you gain and pay for good medical treatment when you are injured or made ill on the job. The doctor or health care group you see is essential to your diagnosis, recovery and receipt of benefits from workers comp. Understanding your choice of doctors after a work-related injury is important to your claim and your financial stability.

Injury and illness is unique to each individual. A responsible physician understands injury to one patient is not the same as the next. As a Berks County worker’s comp attorney, I am frequently asked by my clients if they can see their own doctor. The answer is it depends.

In Pennsylvania, regulations allow your employer to provide you a panel of health care providers to choose among for treatment within the first 90 days after your accident or discovery of your illness. Among that list must be at least three physicians along with other care providers.

While some employers do not control your choice of health care providers in the first 90 days after an injury, many do. As a result, a doctor referred by your employer may examine you after your injury and make a finding favorable to your employer or their insurance company. You may not be properly evaluated or tested and may be advised to return to work sooner than you are able.

In these instances, or when a specialized medical opinion is needed but not available from the physician panel provided by your employer, getting good legal advice prior to visiting a company doctor is essential

Medical response to an injury or illness is the primary reason for workers’ compensation. Make sure you get the treatment — and the legal counsel — you need.

- See more at: http://www.larrypitt.com/2013/05/07/can-i-see-my-own-doctor/#sthash.Efa6BeAZ.dpuf

In Pennsylvania, workers’ compensation is intended to help you gain and pay for good medical treatment when you are injured or made ill on the job. The doctor or health care group you see is essential to your diagnosis, recovery and receipt of benefits from workers comp. Understanding your choice of doctors after a work-related injury is important to your claim and your financial stability.

Injury and illness is unique to each individual. A responsible physician understands injury to one patient is not the same as the next. As a Berks County worker’s comp attorney, I am frequently asked by my clients if they can see their own doctor. The answer is it depends.

In Pennsylvania, regulations allow your employer to provide you a panel of health care providers to choose among for treatment within the first 90 days after your accident or discovery of your illness. Among that list must be at least three physicians along with other care providers.

While some employers do not control your choice of health care providers in the first 90 days after an injury, many do. As a result, a doctor referred by your employer may examine you after your injury and make a finding favorable to your employer or their insurance company. You may not be properly evaluated or tested and may be advised to return to work sooner than you are able.

In these instances, or when a specialized medical opinion is needed but not available from the physician panel provided by your employer, getting good legal advice prior to visiting a company doctor is essential

Medical response to an injury or illness is the primary reason for workers’ compensation. Make sure you get the treatment — and the legal counsel — you need.

- See more at: http://www.larrypitt.com/2013/05/07/can-i-see-my-own-doctor/#sthash.Efa6BeAZ.dpuf

Almost all employees in our state are covered by the Pennsylvania Workers’ Compensation Act. Benefits are intended to provide money and medical resources if you are injured on the job, without the need for you to file a lawsuit against your employer. If you are injured in the workplace, what kinds of benefits are available?

Under the Pennsylvania Workers’ Compensation Act, you are eligible for benefits if you suffer a job-related injury, disease or illness. Compensation is not paid for self-inflicted injury, or injury suffered if you are impaired by illegal drugs or alcohol. Each eligible illness or disease is considered for the following possible benefits:

  • Lost wages: Benefits are available to cover wages you lose when you are out of work with either a partial or total disability.
  • Medical care and expenses: You are entitled to payment for medical care, treatment and specialized supplies for job-related injury or illness.
  • Specific loss: Losing physical use of parts of your body makes you eligible for specific loss benefits. Injuries like scarring of the head, neck or face, or loss of use of arms, legs, digits and senses like sight and hearing are eligible for this compensation.
  • Death benefits: Compensation is paid to your survivors should you suffer a fatal work injury.

You do not need to consult a workers’ comp lawyer before filing a claim, but it is a smart idea to have an experienced attorney look over your application before you file. Making sure your workers comp claim is complete and accurate on the first submission may save you the time and delay of the appeals process if your claim is denied.

Posted in Workers Compensation