U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service Announces Availability Of Draft Economic Analysis For Proposed Critical Habitat For Three Amphibian Species

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The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) recently released (pdf) its draft economic analysis (DEA) for its proposal to designate critical habitat for the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog (Rana sierrae), the northern distinct population segment of the mountain yellow-legged frog (Rana muscosa), and the Yosemite toad (Anaxyrus canorus). The proposed critical habitat designation encompasses approximately 1,831,820 acres of habitat in California.

The purpose of the DEA is to identify and analyze the potential economic impacts associated with the proposed critical habitat designation for the three amphibian species over the next 17 years. The DEA estimates that the costs will be between $630,000 and $1.5 million. Because 97 percent of the designated habitat would be on federal lands, these cost are primarily associated with federal agency consultations pursuant to section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) for actions such as fish stocking, water operations, grazing, and recreation.

Due to the release of the DEA, the Service also announced (pdf) that it reopened the public comment period on its April 25, 2013 proposed rule to list the Sierra Nevada yellow-legged frog and the northern distinct population of the mountain yellow-legged frog as endangered species, and the Yosemite toad as a threatened species under the ESA. It also reopened the public comment period on the proposed rule to designate critical habitat for the three species. The Service will consider any comments received or postmarked on or before March 11, 2014. The Service will hold a public hearing on the proposed rules in Sacramento, California on January 30, 2014 at 1:00 p.m. and 6:00 p.m.