U.S. Fish And Wildlife Service Proposes To Reclassify California Toad

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On March 27, 2014, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) issued a 12-month finding and proposed rule to reclassify the arroyo toad (Anaxyrus californicus), a species that is believed to exist exclusively in California, from endangered to threatened under the Endangered Species Act.  The 12-month finding and proposed rule were initiated by a petition submitted in 2011 by The Pacific Legal Foundation requesting that the Service delist the Inyo California towhee and reclassify from endangered to threatened the arroyo toad, Indian Knob mountainbalm, Lane Mountain milk-vetch, Modoc sucker, and Santa Cruz cypress.  In the 12-month finding and proposed rule, the Service stated that while "there are still significant threats impacting the arroyo toad currently and into the future . . . , we conclude that the overall magnitude of threats impacting the arroyo toad has decreased since the time of listing, due in part to implementation of conservation and management actions."  The Service cited operation of dams and water diversions, urban development, introduced predator species, and drought as some of the most significant threats to the arroyo toad.  According to the 12-month finding and proposed rule, comments must be received or postmarked on or before May 27, 2014.

Topics:  Endangered Species Act, ESA Listings, Fish and Wildlife Service

Published In: Environmental Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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