When Can You Sue a Hotel for Injuries?

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Explore:  Bodily Injury Hotels

R&B singer Johnny Gill sued the Beverly Hills Four Seasons Hotel for damages he suffered during an attack at the hotel’s bar. According to the complaint, a drunken patron yelled racial insults at the singer and then attacked him, pushing him against a heating lamp and causing "great bodily injury with resulting pain and suffering, major medical expenses and loss of earnings." Gill sought $1 million in damages based on the hotel’s negligence, failure to intervene and failure to exercise reasonable care.

Common hotel injuries

Not all hotel injuries are quite so newsworthy, but the resulting injuries — and the principles of legal responsibility — are the same. Common hotel injuries include:

  • Slip and fall accidents — particularly in hotel lobbies, around pool areas and on other freshly cleaned surfaces
  • Fitness injuries —caused by weights falling from a fitness room rack or harm due to poorly maintained cardio-vascular equipment
  • Food poisoning — from failure to exercise food safety precautions in commercial kitchens
  • Assaults — by other patrons, outside individuals or hotel personnel

What you need to prove to win your case

To collect damages from a hotel, you must first show that the hotel failed to exercise ordinary care to prevent the hazardous condition. Examples of his failure include not providing notice of wet floors, poor food safety protocols and insufficient security.