Working Overtime

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Employers and employees alike commonly assume that if an employee is paid an agreed-upon annual salary rather than an hourly wage, that employee is exempt from the strict wage hour laws here in California. For example, employers believe salaried employees are not entitled to overtime pay and meal and break periods. However, that’s not necessarily the case.

“Specific to the white-collar universe, there are exemptions — there’s an executive exemption, an administrative exemption, a computer analyst exemption, a professional exemption — and that means if you meet a salary requirement and you meet duties requirements governed by the statute, then you are classified as exempt and therefore are not entitled to overtime,” says Elise R. Vasquez, partner at Ropers Majeski Kohn & Bentley PC. “What we’ve started to see is an up-rise in white-collar exempt misclassification claims.”

Under the Obama administration, funds have been funneled to labor board investigators meant to probe wage-hour claims to determine whether or not employers are in violation of the wage hour requirement and employees are misclassified as exempt. In the past, many such claims came primarily from blue-collar jobs, such as the restaurant industry. We are seeing more claims from employees for unpaid overtime that they were entitled to, because they were misclassified as exempt based on the job description and duties performed.

Please see full article below for more information.

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