Supreme Court: Third Parties May Sue for Retaliation

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Here you will learn about the January 2011 U.S. Supreme Court case of the fired fiance. You will discover why the Court allowed a man who was fired after his fiancee filed a sex discrimination charge to sue their common employer under Title VII. Employers will receive practical pointers on how to minimize their risk of liability for third-party retaliation claims. And plaintiffs' lawyers will get tips on how to protect their clients' friends and relatives from reprisals. This article appeared in the January/February 2011 edition of "Lux Et Veritas," the newsletter of the law firm of Schneider, Pfahl & Rahme, LLP, where my friend and colleague, Dan Schneider, is a founding partner and accomplished attorney specializing in arts and entertainment, new media, corporate and commercial law. He is also adept at getting parties to a legal dispute to amicably resolve their differences. To learn how we met, read Dan's message.

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DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Alix Rubin | Attorney Advertising

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