Is NSA Becoming Too Intrusive in Efforts to Stop Cyber-Crime?

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The Wall Street Journal has just reported that the National Security Agency is planning to deploy electronic “sensors” in the private computer networks of major companies around the nation. The idea is to detect cyber-attacks by outside forces against companies involved in critical infrastructure like electric or nuclear plants.

Cyber-terrorism is a real threat, and the NSA is the only government agency, probably the only entity of any sort in the nation, that is truly equipped to monitor it. According to the article, national security officials are concerned about possible Chinese and Russian surveillance of our crucial computer networks.

However, the “Big Brother” aspect of this program is inescapable. Like many such programs, it began with a piecemeal effort and with the establishment by the government of co-operative relationships with private industry. But where will the program end? Conceivably, the government will soon routinely gain access to the private data of dozens of companies. Although it will surely pledge not to misuse this information, these pledges can’t always be trusted.

And the article notes that while the government can’t force any company to permit “sensors” to be introduced, it “can provide incentives to urge them to cooperate, particularly if the government already buys services from that company.” That would include pretty much every government contractor – or in other words, every major company.

Please see full article below for more information.

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DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

© Jeff Ifrah | Attorney Advertising

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