Reply Brief of Petitioners


In a unanimous decision, the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals threw out the broadcast flag, the FCC rule that would have crippled digital television receivers starting July 1. The ruling came in ALA v. FCC, a challenge led by Public Knowledge and EFF.

The court ruled, that the FCC lacked authority to regulate what happens inside your TV or computer once it has received a broadcast signal. The broadcast flag rule would have required all signal demodulators to "recognize and give effect to" a broadcast flag, forcing them not to record or output an unencrypted high-def digital signal if the flag were set. This technology mandate, set to take effect July 1, would have stopped the manufacture of open hardware that has enabled us to our own digital television recorders.

This is petitioner's reply brief.

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Reference Info:Appellate Brief | Federal, D.C. Circuit, Federal Admin Agencies | United States

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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