ACLU Wins FOIA Appeal on Prosecutors’ Use of Cell Phone Location Data

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For some time now, the American Civil Liberties Union has been concerned about some federal prosecutors’ practice of seeking court orders to track the location of people’s cell phones without probable cause, arguing that this practice infringes on privacy rights and violates the Fourth Amendment. Last month, the ACLU claimed victory in one of several cases making its way through the court system.

After a four-year battle, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ordered the Department of Justice to comply with a 2007 Freedom of Information Act request from the ACLU and turn over the names and docket numbers of numerous cases in which the government accessed cell phone location data without probable cause or a warrant.

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Published In: Administrative Agency Updates, Civil Remedies Updates, Constitutional Law Updates, Criminal Law Updates, Privacy Updates

DISCLAIMER: Because of the generality of this update, the information provided herein may not be applicable in all situations and should not be acted upon without specific legal advice based on particular situations.

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