News & Analysis as of

ALJ Social Media

Second Circuit Holds NLRB Did Not Err in its Finding that Facebook Posting that Supervisor is a “Nasty Mother F***er” and “F***...

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Second Circuit agrees with the Board that the use of profanity in a Facebook post was not “opprobrious enough” to lose the NLRA’s protections and justify the employer’s termination of the employee....more

“Do You Kiss Your Mother With That Post?” Second Circuit Rules on Foul Facebook Post about Employer

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals stepped in to support the NLRB’s finding that an employee’s profanity-ridden social media posting about his employer (and his employer’s mother) was not so offensive that it went beyond the...more

Labor Relations Today: 2016 Year In Review

by McGuireWoods LLP on

Introduction - In the final year of his two term tenure, President Barack Obama’s National Labor Relations Board and Department of Labor continued their double barrelled efforts to remake labor law to benefit labor...more

NLRB Continues to "Like" Enforcement over Social Media Policies and Related Issues

by Baker Donelson on

In recent years, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has focused attention on company policies that attempt to limit employee engagement in social media. Specifically, the NLRB has consistently taken the position that...more

NLRB Administrative Judge Finds Employee Facebook Post Was Protected Speech

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

Seyfarth Synopsis: A new NLRB decision that attempts to define further the boundaries of protected speech under the NLRA. In Laborers’ International Union of North America and Mantell, Case No. 03-CB-136940 (NLRB...more

Advertising Law - August 2016 #3

ANA, 4As Battle Over Transparency Guidance - Two industry groups are engaging in a public battle over transparency. The dispute began when a joint task force was formed between the American Association of...more

Labor Day Wouldn’t Be Labor Day Without New NLRB Decisions

The onset of Labor Day and the end of the NLRB fiscal year (September 30) one can count on seeing a number of decisions issued.  This year is no different, and perhaps more are being issued during these last few days because...more

NLRB Ruling in Social Media Case Provides Useful Guidance for Employers

by Littler on

Drafting a social media policy in compliance with Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA” or “the Act”) has become increasingly challenging for employers, as the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “the...more

Quirky Question #279: Concerted Activity in 140 Characters or Less

by Dorsey & Whitney LLP on

Question: I am a manager in a medium-sized retailer that has locations and employees in 16 states. The company maintains a social media policy, which was recently updated. ...more

#Concerted Activity in 140 Characters or Less

by Dorsey & Whitney LLP on

Employees have increasingly voiced concerns on social media regarding their employment, often including specific statements about their employers. As previously discussed on this blog, an employee’s Facebook post related to...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB's Triple Play Decision, Expanding Section 7 Protections for Employees' Social Media Activity

by Littler on

Obscenities alone—even when viewed by an employer's customers—do not deprive employees engaged in protected concerted activity of the National Labor Relations Act's ("NLRA" or the "Act") protections. So held the U.S. Court...more

Hold that Friend Request: Legal Traps in a Post-Facebook Work Environment

by Burr & Forman on

Many well-meaning managers engage with employees on social media websites, and doing so provides a host of benefits: stronger relationships between employees and management; a sense of collegiality; instant updates on...more

Surprise! NLRB Approves Employer’s Challenged Social Media Policy

by Allen Matkins on

In somewhat of a surprise, recently the NLRB affirmed an Administrative Law Judge’s decision, which had rejected the NLRB General Counsel’s challenge to a portion of an employer’s social media policy as unlawful. The...more

NLRB rules employee’s vulgar, unprofessional social media post is protected concerted activity

by McAfee & Taft on

Over the past few years, we’ve warned our employer clients that discipline of employees for social media activity has become risky business. The National Labor Relations Board has taken the position that employee commentary...more

NLRB Affirms ALJ On Facebook Firing Case

by Franczek Radelet P.C. on

As we have discussed in several previous alerts, the National Labor Relations Board continues to pursue complaints against employers related to an expanding realm of policies and social media activity. In another recent...more

Employers Must Examine Their Employee Agreements For Compliance With The National Labor Relations Act

by Akerman LLP - HR Defense on

Recently, an Administrative Law Judge (ALJ) for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued a decision in Quicken Loans, Inc., which found confidentiality and non-disparagement provisions to be unlawful under the...more

A Three Course Meal For The New Year

by Cozen O'Connor on

Happy New Year. So much has happened while you spent the holidays undoubtedly velobinding and wrapping the 2012 archives of this blog for your friends and loved ones. So I thought I’d welcome everyone back by updating some...more

NLRB ALJ Issues Additional Social Media Guidance in Dish Network Corporation

The National Labor Relations Board (the NLRB or Board) and its administrative law judges continue to scrutinize employers’ social media policies, with additional guidance being released almost weekly. In a case involving Dish...more

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