News & Analysis as of

Stern Revisited, Testing the Jurisdictional Authority of the Bankruptcy Courts and Beyond

In January, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Executive Benefits Insurance Agency v. Arkison. Executive Benefits is viewed by many as the sequel to Stern v. Marshall, 131 S. Ct. 2594, 180 L. Ed. 2d 475 (2011). In...more

Supreme Court Denies Certiorari for Standing to Sue under the Electronic Fund Transfers Act

The United States Supreme Court declined to grant certiorari to decide whether Congress had the authority to confer Article III standing to sue when the plaintiff suffers no concrete harm and alleges as an injury based on a...more

Cert Petition Asks Supreme Court To Decide Whether Congress Can Allow Uninjured Plaintiffs To Sue In Federal Court

For years, defendants have argued that federal courts may not entertain class-action lawsuits when the plaintiff does not allege that he or she suffered any concrete personal harm and instead relies solely on an “injury in...more

Once Again, Clapper Defeats Data Breach Class Action

Article III standing has once again proved to be an insurmountable hurdle for data breach class action plaintiffs whose personal information hasn’t been misused. In Galaria v. Nationwide Mutual Insurance Co., an Ohio federal...more

FCRA Claim Provides Article III Standing without Showing of Actual Harm, Ninth Circuit Rules

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit has ruled that a plaintiff had Article III standing to sue a website operator for violations of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) regardless of whether he could show actual...more

CFPB files second amicus brief in First American RESPA case

Last year, many observers were disappointed when the U.S. Supreme Court dismissed the appeal in First American Financial Corp. v. Edwards, the case that presented the issue of whether a plaintiff who brings a RESPA claim has...more

Federal Court Dismisses Action Brought by Data Breach Plaintiffs for Failure to Demonstrate Injury Under Clapper

On September 3, 2013, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois dismissed a class action complaint arising from a credit card “skimming” attack suffered by Barnes & Noble in 2012. U.S. District Judge John...more

Genesis Healthcare v. Symczyk: Nearly as Many Questions as Answers

When the petition for certiorari in Genesis Healthcare Corp. v. Symczyk was granted, it appeared that the Supreme Court was poised to resolve a clear split in the Circuits about the permissibility of “pick off” moves, at...more

Supreme Court's New Ruling May Bolster Defense of Data Breach and Privacy Cases

In Clapper v. Amnesty International, 568 U.S. 2013, the United States Supreme Court upheld the strict requirements under Article III for a plaintiff to have standing to sue in privacy cases. Rejecting Respondents' arguments...more

In Clapper v. Amnesty International, Supreme Court Dismisses Privacy Suit for Lack of Article III Standing: Poses a Clear and...

In 2008, the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) was amended, broadening the surveillance powers of the federal government with respect to communications outside of the United States. In Clapper v. Amnesty...more

And After All That Work!: The Dreaded U.S. Supreme Court “DIG”

Originally published in The Washington Legal Foundation’s The Legal Pulse, on January 31, 2013. In the last days of the 2011 Term, fresh off its decisions in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act cases, the...more

A Covenant Not to Sue May Avoid Invalidity Claims

Last week, in Already, LLC v. Nike, Inc. (opinion attached), the Supreme Court unanimously decided that the voluntary cessation doctrine, most often used when a defendant claims its voluntary compliance moots a case where it...more

If You Don’t Want Your Registration Cancelled, Grant Your Opponent a Covenant Not to Sue

The United States Supreme Court, which rarely gets involved in trademark cases, has ruled that when a Defendant in a Trademark infringement case countersues to cancel the Plaintiff’s registration, the Plaintiff can divest a...more

Just Moot It: Supreme Court in Already v. Nike Clarifies When a Covenant Not to Sue Can Kill a Declaratory Judgment Case

In 2007, the Supreme Court in MedImmune v. Genentech broadened the scope of declaratory judgment jurisdiction, making it easier for parties fearing IP claims to bring defensive lawsuits. Last week, the Court made it easier...more

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