Definiteness

News & Analysis as of

Federal Circuit Review - Nautilus, Limelight, and Alice (July 2014)

Supreme Court Sets New Indefiniteness Standard - In Nautilus, Inc. v. Biosig Instruments, Inc., Appeal No. 13-169, the Supreme Court vacated and remanded Federal Circuit’s reversal of summary judgment because the...more

IP Newsflash - July 2014 #2

New Nautilus Indefiniteness Standard Justifies Submission of Expert Evidence at Markman Hearing - The court granted defendants' motion to supplement their claim construction briefing with an expert declaration...more

In Nautilus, Supreme Court Relaxes Standard for Finding Patents Invalid for Indefiniteness

The U.S. Supreme Court, in Nautilus v. Biosig, recently reversed a Federal Circuit ruling that a patent is valid as long as the description of what it claims is not “insolubly ambiguous.” The Supreme Court’s decision, which...more

Inconsistent Figures Render Two Design Patents Indefinite

Spanx, Inc. v. Times Three Clothier, LLC - Case Number: 1:13-cv-02157-DLC (Dkt. 58) - Judge Cote construed claims in six design patents, and determined that two of the patents were indefinite. The patents at...more

Supreme Court Sets Forth New Standard for Indefiniteness, Requiring Greater Precision in Claim Terms than the Standard Long Used...

For over a decade, to show that a claim term is invalid as indefinite under 35 U.S.C. §112, ¶2, the Federal Circuit has required that such terms be "not amenable to construction" or "insolubly ambiguous." The Supreme Court in...more

ITC Section 337 Update

U.S. Supreme Court Overturns Federal Circuit Standards For Patent Inducement Infringement And Indefiniteness – In two decisions on June 2, 2014, the U.S. Supreme Court materially changed the standards for patent...more

Supreme Court Adopts Reasonable Certainty Test for Definiteness

On June 2, 2014, the Supreme Court issued a unanimous decision in Nautilus, Inc. v. Biosig Instruments, Inc., rejecting the Federal Circuit’s “insolubly ambiguous” test for patent claim indefiniteness under 35 USC § 112, and...more

Supreme Court Unanimously Rejects Federal Circuit Standards for Indefiniteness and Induced Infringement

The US Supreme Court issued two anticipated decisions on June 2, 2014, relating to the US Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit's standards for indefiniteness and induced infringement. In the first, Nautilus, Inc....more

Supreme Court Alters Standard for Establishing Indefiniteness

A recent unanimous decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Nautilus v. Biosig significantly increases the opportunity for a claim to be held as indefinite. In particular, the Supreme Court has set forth a new standard...more

Supreme Court Adopts "Reasonable Certainty" Standard for Evaluating Indefiniteness Challenges to Patent Claims

On June 2, 2014, the Supreme Court rejected the Federal Circuit’s standard for determining whether a patent claim is invalid for indefiniteness under 35 U.S.C. §112(b), adopting instead a standard requiring greater clarity in...more

Supreme Court: Patent Claims Must Provide “Clear Notice” To What Is Claimed

On June 2, 2014, the unanimous Supreme Court of the United States, in Nautilus, Inc. v. Biosig Instruments, Inc., a case that focused on the standard for compliance with the “definiteness” requirement of 35 U.S.C. § 112, ¶ 2,...more

Supreme Court Strengthens the Definiteness Requirement for Patent Claims

On June 2, 2014, in Nautilus, Inc. v. Biosig Instruments, Inc., No. 13-369, the Supreme Court unanimously rejected the Federal Circuit’s test for determining indefiniteness of a patent claim as “lack[ing] the precision that §...more

The Cahill Prosecution In Massachusetts: Vagueness Is Still A Problem After Skilling

Vagueness is a common problem in white-collar criminal cases. In many instances the line between legal and illegal conduct is blurry at best. This means that someone could face prosecution, a damaged reputation, loss of...more

Intellectual Property Client Alert: Definiteness in Patent Claims

The Federal Circuit, in Function Media v. Google, has determined that use of “means” language in a claim can lead to indefiniteness. Functional Media sued Google for infringement of three patents regarding advertising...more

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