DNA Patent-Eligible Subject Matter

News & Analysis as of

Biotech Industry Supports Cert in Sequenom to Avert “Crisis of Patent Law and Medical Innovation”

The biotechnology and life sciences community has voiced broad support for Sequenom’s recent request that the Supreme Court review the Federal Circuit’s decision holding Sequenom’s diagnostic fetal DNA patent ineligible under...more

Sequenom v. Ariosa Diagnostics: A Supreme Court Petition that Requests Clarification on the Patent Eligibility of Diagnostic...

UUnder the Patent Act, one can patent “any new and useful process, machine, manufacture, or composition of matter, or any new and useful improvement thereof.” Common exceptions to what can be patented include laws of nature,...more

Novel Applications of Natural Laws Remain Unpatentable Under 35 USC §101

In Genetic Technologies (GTG), the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) held the line in the patent eligibility saga in the field of biotechnology. GTG asserted U.S. Patent No. 5,612,179 against Merial and...more

Supreme Court Asked to Clarify Limits on Diagnostic Method Patents

Arguing that the current state of the law weakens the patent system and poses a danger to life science innovators, biotechnology company, Sequenom, Inc., has filed a writ of certiorari with the U.S. Supreme Court, asking the...more

Can Science be Copyrighted? You Might be Surprised…

Biotechnology. For many, the mere mention of the word stirs up a thought of people in white lab coats working in underground bunkers trying to create superhuman mutant weapons, with beakers of green goo bubbling in the...more

Another Diagnostic Patent Falls Under 101

In Genetic Techs Ltd v Merial LLC (Fed. Cir., April 8, 2016), the Federal Circuit invalidated yet another diagnostic patent for failing to satisfy 35 U.S.C. § 101 on the ground that the claims recite nothing more than a law...more

Methods Exploiting Junk DNA May Be Useful But Lack Patent Eligibility

Striking another blow against patent eligibility in the field of biotechnology, the Federal Circuit agreed with the district court that methods that use “junk DNA” to detect genetic variations lack patent eligibility under 35...more

Claims Directed to Detection of Gene Variants Patent-Ineligible, Notwithstanding Mental Activity Requirement

Genetic Technologies Ltd. v. Merial L.L.C., __ F.3d __ (Fed. Cir. Apr. 8, 2016) (Prost, DYK, Taranto) (D. Del.: Stark) (4 of 5 stars) - Federal Circuit affirms judgment that patent claims are invalid under § 101. Genetic...more

Genetic Technologies Affirms Ariosa/Myriad With An Introduction By The Sequenom Petition for Cert.

On April 1st, Lilly filed an amicus brief in favor of Sequenom’s petition for cert. seeking to reverse Ariosa, that caused a lot of buzz in the IP community. (A copy is available at the end of this post.) To summarize, it...more

Discoveries Are Not Patentable.

In Genetic Technologies Limited v. Merial LLC. [2015-1202, -1203] (April 8, 2016) the Federal Circuit affirmed the district court dismissal for failure to state a claim and entry of final judgment that claims 1–25 and 33–36...more

Sequenom Petitions for Certiorari

Sequenom filed its anticipated petition for certiorari today for Supreme Court review of the Federal Circuit's decision in Ariosa v. Sequenom. The petition advises the Court that it "should take this opportunity to provide...more

The Genetics of Gender Discrimination in Date Palm Patenting

You’re driving south out of Indio along the Grapefruit Boulevard towards Thermal and Mecca because their names sound promising.  A parched desert plain extends to your left, leading up to the austere ridgelines of Joshua Tree...more

Eligibility of Isolated Nucleic Acid: Australian and U.S. Standards

This is the second of a two-part series comparing Australian and U.S. law and will focus on patent eligibility of an isolated nucleic acid sequence. Are the patent eligibility standards for isolated nucleic acid...more

Hands Tied: Patenting Diagnostic Inventions Remain a Difficult Task

What does the Federal Circuit really think about the Supreme Court’s recent § 101 jurisprudence? The denial of the petition for rehearing en banc in Ariosa Diagnostics v. Sequenom in November of 2015 answers that question....more

Litigation Alert: Federal Circuit’s Ariosa Decision, Good Chance for Rehearing En Banc

In June of this year, the Federal Circuit panel in Ariosa Diagnostics, Inc. v. Sequenom, Inc. invalidated a patent on the grounds of patent-ineligible subject matter. 788 F.3d 1371 (Fed. Cir. 2015). While the case is one of...more

Natera Responds to Sequenom's Petition for Rehearing En Banc

Last week, Appellee Natera, Inc. filed its response to the petition for rehearing en banc filed by Appellants Sequenom, Inc. and Sequenom Center for Molecular Medicine, LLC in August (see "Sequenom Requests Rehearing En...more

Ariosa Diagnostics Responds to Sequenom's Petition for Rehearing En Banc

On Monday, Appellee Ariosa Diagnostics, Inc. filed its response to the petition for rehearing en banc filed by Appellants Sequenom, Inc. and Sequenom Center for Molecular Medicine, LLC in August. In its response, Ariosa...more

Australian Patent Office Proposes “Coding Only” Sequence Ban

Coming soon after the High Court’s “Myriad decision” in Australia, the Australian Patent Office has proposed guidelines that would effectively limit the ban on patent-eligibility of DNA sequences to nucleic acids that code...more

Can a natural product still be patented in Australia?

Yes. While various commentaries have suggested that patentable subject matter will be restricted in Australia under the recent High Court Myriad decision to exclude naturally occurring products (whether or not isolated), my...more

What did the Australian High Court actually say about the patent eligibility of cDNA?

As the dust from the impact of the Australian Myriad decision begins to settle, now is the time to revisit what many have said regarding patent eligibility of cDNA, against what the final appeal Court actually said. On...more

“Does a nucleic acid constitute patent eligible subject matter under Australia law?”

That is the question that we hoped Australia’s final appeal Court to have answered in the Myriad decision that it handed down last week. Some observers have been quite forthright on the point: ‘Yes, the High Court of...more

Does a Nucleic Acid Constitute Patent Eligible Subject Matter Under Australian Law?

Clearly the High Court has given an answer to a question, but was that question the one we anticipated? That in itself is an open question!...more

Australian High Court Rules Gene Patents Unpatentable

Like the United States Supreme Court, the High Court of Australia has determined that Myriad’s patents directed to purified and isolated DNA molecules encoding the BRCA genes are unpatentable. Indeed, the Australian Court...more

Life Sciences Alert: High Court of Australia unanimously decides that isolated genetic material is not patentable in Australia

In D'Arcy v Myriad Genetics Inc [2015] HCA 35 (D'Arcy v Myriad) the High Court of Australia has unanimously held (by way of three separate judgments: majority decision (French CJ, Kiefel, Bell, and Keane JJ) and two...more

Physiology/Medicine Nobels Awarded for Discoveries of “Natural Products”

In re Roslin Institute, a Fed. Cir. panel consisting of Judges Dyk, Moore and Wallach ruled that methods of isolating cffDNA were not patent eligible. Judge Dyk, writing for the panel endorsed the “markedly different”...more

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