Employee Rights Supreme Court of the United States

Most countries provide some degree of workplace protection for employees and job applicants. Depending on the jurisdiction, these protections generally include safety precautions and policies, anti-discrimination... more +
Most countries provide some degree of workplace protection for employees and job applicants. Depending on the jurisdiction, these protections generally include safety precautions and policies, anti-discrimination policies, collective bargaining and unionizing rights, meal and rest requirements, minimum wage rules, and medical and family leave rights to name a few. In the United States, the federal framework for employee rights stem from statutes such as the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, and the Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA). In addition, employee rights statutes are implemented and enforced by regulatory authorities such as the EEOC, NLRB, OSHA, and the Department of Labor. Further, many state and local governments provide additional and localized protections for employees that are enforced by local regulatory entities. less -
News & Analysis as of

Supreme Court Denies Stay of DOL’s Home Care Rule

On December 22, 2014, in Home Care Association of America v. Weil, the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia vacated a key portion of a U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) regulation amending the minimum wage and...more

Be Aware of Public Employees Disciplinary Proceedings Protections: Loudermill, Wiengarten and Garrity

This post is primarily for public sector employers such as state agencies, municipalities and districts. By virtue of being employed by the government and quite likely represented by a labor union, public sector employees in...more

Lessons Employers Can Learn from Kentucky Clerk’s Same-Sex Marriage License Dispute

Almost every day the news carries an additional story about Kim Davis, the Rowan County, Kentucky clerk who has defied the Supreme Court by refusing to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples. The Kim Davis story may be...more

Settlement of Wage Claims Under FLSA Must Now be Approved by the Court

A panel of the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit has ruled that parties may not stipulate to dismiss cases brought under the Fair Labor Standards Act without court approval. This ruling may make it more...more

Impact of the Same-Sex Marriage Decision on Employee Benefit Plans

In Obergefell v. Hodges, the Supreme Court held that states may not deny same-sex couples the right to marry, finding that doing so violates the Fourteenth Amendment. Writing for the five-justice majority, Justice Kennedy...more

Employment Law - August 2015

California Sick Leave Law Gets Updates - Why it matters: California's Healthy Workplaces, Healthy Families Act just took effect on July 1 but Governor Jerry Brown has already signed into law tweaks to the statute....more

Second Circuit Clarifies Pleading Standard for Title VII Claims

A Second Circuit panel recently revived a former employee’s racial discrimination suit against New York City, reversing in part the Southern District of New York’s dismissal of her case. In Littlejohn v. City of New York,...more

RI Employers (Large and Small) Required to Accommodate Healthy Pregnant Workers and New Moms. No, FMLA Leave is Not Enough.

Last month, the Rhode Island Fair Employment Practices Act was amended to require employers with 4 or more employees to provide reasonable accommodations to employees and prospective employees with a “condition”. Such...more

That is SO last week - August 2015

Last week, the world mourned Cecil the Lion, and all eyes were on the Minnesota dentist who killed him. The scrutiny of the dentist unearthed, among other things, a sexual harassment complaint lodged against him by a former...more

“Hair Today? Gone Tomorrow!”: Employers Face Obstacles When It Comes to Enforcing Look Policies

Your author joined the ranks of the bearded in January after six years of daily shaving for the Air Force, skillfully concealing his newfound hirsuteness (look it up) amid the current popularity in facial hair (see: Special...more

Is Sexual Orientation Now a Protected Class?

In our June 26 alert regarding the U.S. Supreme Court's same-sex marriage decision in Obergefell v. Hodges, we said we would continue to keep you posted regarding new developments in this area of the law. Some of you may...more

California Employment Law Notes - July 2015

Employee's Inability To Work For A Particular Supervisor Does Not Constitute A "Disability" - Higgins-Williams v. Sutter Med. Found., 237 Cal. App. 4th 78 (2015) - Michaelin Higgins-Williams worked as a clinical...more

Disciplinary Investigations of Employees – Three Names to Know

Whenever an employer is considering disciplining an employee for misconduct, three names from 1967, 1975 and 1985 continue to be associated with employer investigations and interrogations, in much the same way that Mr....more

The Supreme Court Addresses Federal Health Care Subsidies and Same-Sex Marriage

Two recent Supreme Court decisions have implications for employee benefit plan sponsors: King v. Burwell, decided June 25, 2015, and Obergefell v. Hodges, decided June 26, 2015....more

Employment Law - July 2015

The Impact of National Same-Sex Marriage for Employers - Why it matters: How will employers feel the impact of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Obergefell v. Hodges? The landmark ruling that the Fourteenth...more

EEOC Issues Guidance - Best Practices for Pregnancy Discrimination and Related Issues

Discrimination on the basis of pregnancy, childbirth, or related medical conditions constitutes unlawful sex discrimination under Title VII. The EEOC recently issued new Enforcement Guidance to ensure employers treat women...more

So Same-Sex Marriage Is Legal … Now What? Important Decisions Employers Face Now

In Obergefell v. Hodges, the U.S. Supreme Court held that the 14th Amendment to the Constitution requires all 50 states to license marriages between same-sex couples and to recognize same-sex marriages performed out-of-state....more

The Supreme Court’s Same-Sex Marriage Ruling & Its Employment Implications

Unless you’ve been living under a rock, you probably are well aware that on June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that same sex couples have a constitutional right to marry and have their marriages recognized across the...more

FMLA’s Expanded Definition of “Spouse” Now Effective in All States

As discussed in our prior article, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) promulgated a final rule on February 25, 2015 that, effective March 27, modified the federal Family and Medical Leave Act’s (FMLA) definition of “spouse”...more

EEOC’s Revised Pregnancy Guidance: Now, Just Barely More Flexible!

Last Thursday, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission issued its amended guidance on pregnancy discrimination and accommodation in light of the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Young v. UPS, issued in March 2015. The...more

The Benefits of Equality: How Same-Sex Marriage Can Strengthen Your Business

Regardless of whether you believe the Supreme Court should have decided the issue, last week’s decision on marriage equality has the potential to benefit your business. Because the decision creates a uniform definition of...more

What Does SCOTUS Same-Sex Marriage Decision Mean For Employers?

Seriously, I don’t think Friday’s Supreme Court decision in Obergefell v. Hodges will be that big a deal for most employers. The Supreme Court already decided in 2013 that the federal definition of “spouse” included same-sex...more

Supreme Court’s Marriage Decision Should Prompt Employers’ Review of All Employment Policies

“No union is more profound than marriage, for it embodies the highest ideals of love, fidelity, devotion, sacrifice, and family. In forming a marital union, two people become something greater than once they were. … Their...more

Same-Sex Marriage Ruling Will Impact Employers

On Friday, June 26, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court issued its ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges, a landmark decision in which it held all state laws banning same-sex marriage to be unconstitutional. The effect of this decision is...more

Supreme Court Says Constitution Requires States to License Same-Sex Marriages

In another blockbuster 5-4 ruling authored by Justice Kennedy, in Obergefell v. Hodges, 576 U.S. ___. ____ (2015), the U.S. Supreme Court has held that the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution requires a state to license...more

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