News & Analysis as of

Facebook The National Labor Relations Act

Second Circuit Identifies Outer Limits of NLRA-Protected Speech

The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) generally prohibits employers from retaliating against employees based on their union-related activities or for taking concerted action to improve the terms and conditions of their...more

Social Media Lesson for Employers: Recent $1.5 Million Retaliatory Discharge Verdict

by McNair Law Firm, P.A. on

On May 11, 2017, a federal jury in Charlotte, North Carolina awarded a former fire department employee, Crystal Eschert, a $1.5 million verdict in a retaliatory discharge lawsuit that teaches powerful lessons in today’s...more

Employer Cannot Fire Employees For Obscenity-Laced Facebook Posts During Union Organizing Campaign

by Tonkon Torp LLP on

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act protects employees who engage in concerted activities for purposes of collective bargaining or for mutual aid and protection. How far that protection extends was tested in NLRB v....more

Second Circuit Rules on Bounds of Protected Concerted Activity

In a case at the edges of protected employee conduct during a union organizing drive, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals last week found that an employee’s expletive-laden Facebook post cursing out his boss—and his boss’s...more

Don’t Feed The Trolls: What Employers Can Do To Combat Internet Trolls

by Fisher Phillips on

...The internet has forever changed the way information is shared. The rapid-fire online patter produces comments and information that could be both helpful and harmful to an employer and its employees. On the one hand, such...more

Second Circuit Weighs in on Social Media, Profanity, and the NLRA

by PretiFlaherty on

One of the fundamental protections of the National Labor Relations Act is that employers may not discipline employees for engaging in concerted activities relating to the terms and conditions of their employment. Whether an...more

Expletive-Laced Facebook Rant Protected Under Federal Labor Law

Many people have fanaticized about telling their boss what they really think about him or her. Fortunately, most employees have the good sense not to write down what they are thinking about their employer....more

Oh F**k: Employee’s Profane Facebook Post is Protected Activity

On April 21, 2017, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals upheld a National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or Board) ruling that an employer violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or Act) when it discharged a catering...more

!@#$% Vote Yes for the UNION! Facebook Post Protected by the NLRA? Second Circuit Says Yes

In National Labor Relations Board v. Pier Sixty, LLC, No. 15-1841 (April 21, 2017), the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) finding that an employee’s Facebook post, although “vulgar and...more

Court Upholds Reinstatement of Fired Facebook Ranter

Employers, what would you do if an employee made a post on Facebook that referred to his/her supervisor as a “nasty mother***er” and also stated “f**k [the supervisor] and [his/her] entire f***ing family?” It’s a no-brainer...more

Employment Law Navigator – Week in Review: May 2017

by Zelle LLP on

Last week, we saw several developments in the area of race discrimination in employment, including a Second Circuit decision that has generated media coverage and commentary. The Second Circuit’s ruling reversed a lower court...more

Second Circuit Holds NLRB Did Not Err in its Finding that Facebook Posting that Supervisor is a “Nasty Mother F***er” and “F***...

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

Seyfarth Synopsis: The Second Circuit agrees with the Board that the use of profanity in a Facebook post was not “opprobrious enough” to lose the NLRA’s protections and justify the employer’s termination of the employee....more

Now You, Too, Can Call Your Boss a Nasty Motherf****r

by Kelley Drye & Warren LLP on

Maybe we’ve all thought it at some point in our careers. But according to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, you might actually be able to get away with saying it—that is, calling your boss a nasty mother****r—if you’re...more

“Do You Kiss Your Mother With That Post?” Second Circuit Rules on Foul Facebook Post about Employer

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals stepped in to support the NLRB’s finding that an employee’s profanity-ridden social media posting about his employer (and his employer’s mother) was not so offensive that it went beyond the...more

Every Manager and Their Mother: Second Circuit Shields Social Media Insults against Supervisor and His Entire Family

On Friday, April 21, 2017 a Second Circuit Court of Appeals panel affirmed a National Labor Relations Board ruling that a catering company server was wrongfully terminated for making an obscene and vicious Facebook post that...more

Is Calling Your Boss “a Nasty Mother******” Protected Activity?

by Shipman & Goodwin LLP on

My colleague Gary Starr returns today with a decision from the Second Circuit (which covers Connecticut) that may just surprise you. Then again, if you’ve been following this line of reasoning, perhaps not....more

Second Circuit Holds Termination of Employee Who Attacked Supervisor in Obscene Facebook Post Violates NLRA

The Second Circuit said last week that an employer violated the National Labor Relations Act when it fired an employee who criticized a supervisor on Facebook during an election. The catch here is that the Second Circuit...more

Employers Beware: Facebook Posts May Not Be Enough to Fire Employees

by Cole Schotz on

On Friday, April 21, 2017, the Second Circuit affirmed a National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) ruling, which found that Pier Sixty, LLC (“Pier Sixty”) violated the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) when it terminated...more

Profane Facebook Message Protected Under The NLRA

by Saul Ewing LLP on

Last week, the Second Circuit held that an employer violated the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) when it fired an employee who had posted a profane and vulgar message on Facebook that insulted a manager and urged...more

F-Word Facebook Firing Flipped By Federal Court

by Fisher Phillips on

In a ruling that could leave employers fuming and possibly cursing, a federal appellate court ruled that an employee who used a public Facebook page to curse out not just his boss, but also his boss’s mother and entire...more

NLRB Finds Employee’s Facebook Posts Critical of Union Protected

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

Seyfarth Synopsis: NLRB affirms ALJ’s ruling finding that a union member’s criticisms on Facebook of the union that represented him were protected by the NLRA. On February 7, 2017, in Laborers’ International Union of...more

You Posted What??? Deep Thoughts With Employees On Social Media

Social media sites, such a Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Snapchat, are wonderful places to see what someone ate for dinner, find the latest meme or gif you don’t understand, or reconnect with people you were never friends...more

Why after-hours social media posts can still spell on-the-job trouble

by McNees Wallace & Nurick LLC on

Many people think that only teenagers and twentysomethings are using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Google Plus to interact with others. Not so....more

What’s Good for the Goose…

by Miles & Stockbridge P.C. on

Over the past few years, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has taken issue with employers that discipline employees over Facebook and other social media postings. The NLRB allows employees to discuss wages and other...more

NLRB Administrative Judge Finds Employee Facebook Post Was Protected Speech

by Seyfarth Shaw LLP on

Seyfarth Synopsis: A new NLRB decision that attempts to define further the boundaries of protected speech under the NLRA. In Laborers’ International Union of North America and Mantell, Case No. 03-CB-136940 (NLRB...more

127 Results
|
View per page
Page: of 6
Cybersecurity

"My best business intelligence,
in one easy email…"

Your first step to building a free, personalized, morning email brief covering pertinent authors and topics on JD Supra:
Sign up using*

Already signed up? Log in here

*By using the service, you signify your acceptance of JD Supra's Privacy Policy.
*With LinkedIn, you don't need to create a separate login to manage your free JD Supra account, and we can make suggestions based on your needs and interests. We will not post anything on LinkedIn in your name. Or, sign up using your email address.
Feedback? Tell us what you think of the new jdsupra.com!