Facebook Termination

News & Analysis as of

The Second Circuit Tackles Employee Rights, Obscenities & Social Media Use

Employers took note last year when the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled that “liking” a Facebook post can qualify as protected activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The NLRB held that the owner of...more

Second Circuit “Likes” Where NLRB Shakes Out on Social Media: Finds that Facebook “Likes” and Obscenity-Riddled Posts Were...

A unanimous panel of the Second Circuit recently upheld the NLRB’s well-publicized Facebook “Like” decision, which found that a sports bar violated the National Labor Relations Act when it terminated two employees for...more

Facebook “Like” Protected Speech Under the NLRA

We all have them. Friends and family who overshare on Facebook. Their food choices (complete with pictures), exercise routine, and relationship drama, all solidified in the form of a status update. Annoying maybe, but mostly...more

Employee Fairly Dismissed for Facebook Comments Posted Two Years Earlier

What happened? In Smith v British Waterways Board the Employment Appeal Tribunal (“EAT”) decided that an employee was fairly dismissed for posting derogatory and disparaging comments on Facebook despite the comments being...more

Teacher Fired Over Racist Facebook Post

In the age of social media, many people post their opinions on sites, such as Facebook, without carefully considering the possible consequences and resulting backlash. For example, Karen Fitzgibbons, a teacher at the Frenship...more

Will the Second Circuit “Like” the NLRB’s Recent Stance on Social Media? An Update on the Facebook “Like” Firing Case

The NLRB last week filed its brief at the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in the well-publicized Facebook “Like” firing case, Three D, LLC v. NLRB. Prior to the appeal, we discussed the NLRB’s August 2014 ruling here as part...more

NLRB determines vulgar Facebook posts protected concerted activity

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) determined that Pier Sixty LLC, a New York catering service, violated federal labor law by firing an employee server after he posted a Facebook message protesting supervisory abuse...more

Facebooker–Good Citizen or Fired?

Can an employee’s Facebook post be grounds for termination? The Fifth Circuit says, “Yes.” Graziosi v. City of Greenville Mississippi, No. 13-60900 (5th Cir. January 9, 2015). A police officer posted on her Facebook page and...more

NLRB Says On-Line Planning For Insubordination Is Not Protected Concerted Activity

In Richmond District Neighborhood Center, Case 20-CA-091748 (Oct. 28, 2014), the Board upheld an Administrative Law Judge’s ruling that a conversation between two employees, who were involved with student programming at the...more

Breach of Confidentiality Clause Leads to Disgorgement of Settlement

In this employment termination case, plaintiff Snay (a school principal), and Defendant, Gulliver (the school), settled and agreed to keep the settlement confidential. Four days after the parties signed the settlement...more

Employee Fired For Facebook Rant Doesn't Like Status

There’s no doubt about it – Facebook is the 21st Century water cooler. Workers who used to gather in the break room to talk about the latest sports news, the newest outrageous celebrity scandal, or the latest office gossip...more

Facebook: Fireable Offense or Free Speech?

The interplay between an employee’s postings on Facebook and the impact of those postings on his or her employment status is an evolving area of the law. Just last month, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of...more

Nurse Using Abusive Language Toward Hospital Administrator on Facebook Justifies Firing

As this blog has covered on a number of occasions, employee speech on Facebook, particularly if it is profane, vituperative or threatening, can lead to termination. A number of courts in recent months have grappled with the...more

NLRB Judge Rules Facebook Chatter Was Concerted Activity, But That Conduct Was Egregious Enough To Justify Employees' Termination

A National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) administrative law judge recently held that while two employees’ Facebook discussions were concerted activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), the particular conduct at...more

Disputed Facebook Post Can Justify a Firing And Is Not Pretextual

As this blog illustrated recently, sentiments posted on Facebook, if sufficiently vulgar or offensive, can cause a person to lose his job. The Seventh Circuit recently issued a decision analyzing whether a profane and...more

First Amendment Does Not Prevent State From Firing Employee For Derogatory Facebook Comments

Though the First Amendment affords greater free speech protections for government employees relative to those in the private sector, the speakers do not have carte blanche to insult or deride whomever they see fit. Rather,...more

New Jersey District Court Holds That Stored Communications Act Protects Employee’s Private Facebook Posts, But Employer Still Free...

In Ehling v. Monmouth-Ocean Hospital Service Corp., No. 2:11-cv-03305-WJM-MF (D.N.J. Aug. 20, 2013), a registered nurse was fired after her employer viewed several of her controversial private Facebook posts. In a matter of...more

Workplace Policy Institute: Social Media Password Protection and Privacy — The Patchwork of State Laws and How It Affects...

Introduction - Social media websites such as Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and others have become a part of daily life in the United States and abroad. The unavoidable reach of social media into our personal lives has...more

Facebook Postings Showing Misuse of FMLA Leave Can Form Sufficient Legal Basis of Termination

Based on the number of social media decisions from the National Labor Relations Board over the past two years, most employers understand that when employee Facebook postings constitute “protected activity” under the National...more

Tweet, Follow, Or Get Out Of The Way: What All Employers Need To Know About Social Media In The Workplace

Facebook. Twitter. LinkedIn. YouTube. Blogs. Email. Texts. Social media in the workplace has become a fact of life for all employers. Companies are learning that these once feared social media sites can be powerful marketing...more

NLRB Orders Reinstatement of Employees Fired Over Discussion on Facebook

In Hispanics United of Buffalo, Inc., 359 NLRB No. 37 (Dec. 14, 2012), the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) found that an employer violated section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) by firing five...more

Fenwick Employment Brief - February 2013

In This Issue: *FEATURE ARTICLES - Cal Supreme Court Refuses To Immunize Employers In Mixed-Motive Discrimination Cases, But Significantly Limits Remedies - Manager's Bias, Public Policy, And Defamation...more

Employee’s Facebook Fumble Dooms Her FMLA Claims

As we have previously mentioned, an employer’s use of social media content has its risks and legal limitations. However, under certain circumstances, an employee’s social media activity may prove relevant to and warrant...more

NLRB Issues Pair of Decisions Limiting Employer Discipline and Policies Regarding Social Media

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently issued a pair of decisions helping to clarify the limits on employers’ ability to (1) discipline employees for their social media activities and (2) implement confidentiality...more

New Jersey District Dismisses Teacher Who Called Students “Future Criminals” On Facebook

Earlier this month, a New Jersey appellate court affirmed the dismissal of a tenured teacher for comments she made about her students on Facebook. Good summaries of the case, In re O’Brien, can be found through the National...more

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