Family Medical Leave Act

The Family Medical Leave Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1993 to protect employees from negative employment consequences associated with family illness. The FMLA allows covered employees to take... more +
The Family Medical Leave Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1993 to protect employees from negative employment consequences associated with family illness. The FMLA allows covered employees to take up to twelve weeks of unpaid, job-protected leave, in order to care for a qualified family member or address a personal medical issue.   Situations covered under the Act include: birth of a child and care of a newborn; placement of an adopted or foster child; serious illness of an employee's spouse, child or parent;  serious illness of the employee that affects ability to perform his/her job; situations arising out of an employee's spouse, child or parent's active military service. Employees who take leave to care for a seriously injured family servicemember are eligible for longer periods of covered leave.  less -
News & Analysis as of

New Bill Expands Illinois Human Rights Act's Pregnancy Protections

On August 26, 2014, Illinois Governor Pat Quinn signed House Bill 8, amending the Illinois Human Rights Act by placing new obligations on employers with respect to pregnant employees. The new changes take effect on January 1,...more

FMLA Stands for "Family and Medical Leave Avalanche"

We noted last year that 20 years after the original passage of the Family and Medical Leave Act (“FMLA”), the Department of Labor issued a survey report lauding the effectiveness of the law and the positive impact it has had...more

Persuading Employee to Work Rather than Taking Unpaid Leave May Result in FMLA Violation

The Family and Medical Leave Act ("FMLA") requires employers to provide eligible employees with up to twelve weeks of unpaid leave to care for a newborn child (among other reasons), and to offer reinstatement to the employee...more

Think Before You “Snail Mail” Those FMLA Notices

When I conduct employment trainings, I often caution executives and managers to think before they email. In my experience, people tend to be more casual and to use poorer judgment when they email than when they write a memo...more

An Estimate is Just That - The Seventh Circuit Highlights Several Important Lessons for Employers Navigating Intermittent FMLA...

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit recently ruled on two important intermittent Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) leave issues in Hansen v. Fincantieri Marine Group. First, the court determined that the FMLA...more

Employment Law Posters to be Displayed in the Workplace – Some New and Some Old

When the Oklahoma legislature revamped Oklahoma’s anti-discrimination laws in mid-2013, one of the new requirements imposed (and enforced by the Oklahoma Attorney General’s Office of Civil Rights’ Enforcement) was a...more

ADAAA Expanded Ability of Parents to Take FMLA Leave for Disabled Adult Son or Daughter

Human resource professionals occasionally receive requests from employees to take FMLA leave to care for an adult son or daughter with an alleged serious health condition. Some of the most frequent requests involve FMLA time...more

When it Comes to an FMLA Notice — the Post Office May Not Deliver For You in the Third Circuit

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit recently ruled that an employer may not rely on “the Mailbox Rule” to prove that the employer provided an employee with notice of his or her rights under the Family and Medical...more

Mailing FMLA Notices to Employees? Not So Fast

Recently, the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit issued an opinion analyzing the so-called "mailbox rule" in a case which centered on the receipt of an FMLA notice. In Lupyan v. Corinthian Colleges, Inc.,...more

Mailing of FMLA Notices Not Sufficient to Overcome Denial of Receipt by Employee

On August 5, 2014, the Third Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that an employer’s claim that it mailed to its employee a notice of rights under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA or Act) is not enough to rebut the employee’s...more

Enforcing Your Policies Outside The Workplace

All employers adopt and enforce policies regulating conduct at the workplace. Many employers expect that employees will follow their employment polices at all times regardless of whether the employee is working or at work....more

Employee fired for failing to cooperate with FMLA leave approval process

Managing employees’ FMLA leave can be one of the most challenging and frustrating responsibilities for an HR department. So what can an employer do when an employee is slow to provide documentation and respond to exam...more

A Game-Changing Decision? Sending FMLA Notices to Employees by U.S. Mail May Not Cut It Anymore

With all the FMLA paperwork that a leave administrator has to provide an employee during the FMLA process, you’d wonder whether you’re attending a real estate closing. All these documents — whether it’s the Notice of...more

You’re on Leave — Return Receipt Requested

An employee over-extends her FMLA leave and the employer declines to reinstate her. The employee exclaims that she never knew she was on FMLA – short term disability, sure, but not FMLA. ...more

Executive Order Requires New Disclosures for Federal Contractors

On Thursday, July 31, 2014, President Obama signed an Executive Order called "Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces," requiring covered federal contractors and subcontractors to publicly report labor violations, to forgo the use of...more

EEOC Roundup: June 2014

Employment is heavily regulated in the U.S., where it is illegal to discriminate against a job applicant or an employee because of the person's race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or...more

Federal Contractors Beware – Part 3

Federal contractors beware. More changes are coming your way, again. On July 31, 2014, President Obama issued an executive order titled the “Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order”. First, the order requires companies...more

New Executive Order Places Additional Reporting Obligations on Government Contractors and Creates an Additional Weapon in the...

On July 31, 2014, President Obama signed the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order, which requires both government contracting officers and government contractors to track and coordinate contractor and subcontractor...more

Executive Order May Block Contractors with Labor Violations from Receiving Federal Contracts

On July 31, 2014, President Obama signed the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order (“Executive Order”) that requires contractors to (1) disclose recent violations of various workplace laws before being awarded federal...more

Executive Order Requires Reporting Labor Law Violations and Prohibits Arbitration Agreements

As part of President Obama's "Year of Action," President Obama recently announced the Fair Pay and Safe Workplaces Executive Order (the "Executive Order"). The Executive Order will require prospective federal...more

EEOC Releases Guidance on Pregnancy Discrimination Laws

Guidance Does Not Address State-specific Laws and Requirements - The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has released its new enforcement guidance on pregnancy discrimination issues. This is the first time in...more

The EEOC Delivers its Expected New Guidance on Pregnancy Discrimination

Dust off your handbooks and rethink your employment policies – the EEOC has just announced some significant changes in how it is going to investigate and litigate pregnancy discrimination claims....more

Now This is a Headache! Employee Terminated for Migraine Headaches Can Advance FMLA Claim

In the cold, sadistic world that is the FMLA, the Department of Labor tells us that ordinary, run-of-the-mill headaches (a/k/a “non-migraine” headaches) are not covered by the FMLA. Migraine headaches, on the other hand, are...more

California Family Rights Act Interference Claims Proceed

Moore v. Century Gaming Management, Inc., No. B249978 (June 4, 2014): The California Court of Appeal recently ruled in an employee’s favor in a suit in which she claimed that her employer interfered with her rights under the...more

General Counsel of the NLRB Opens the Door for Franchisors to be Liable for the Actions of their Franchisees

In a directive that has rocked the franchise world, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or the Board) Office of the General Counsel determined that McDonald’s USA, LLC, as the franchisor, could potentially be held liable...more

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