Hiring & Firing Retaliation Supreme Court of the United States

Hiring & Firing refers to the process of recruiting, interviewing and offering employment and the process of evaluating performance and dismissing employees. Hiring & Firing is a highly regulated area and... more +
Hiring & Firing refers to the process of recruiting, interviewing and offering employment and the process of evaluating performance and dismissing employees. Hiring & Firing is a highly regulated area and can create tremendous liability for employers who fail to properly adhere to acceptable employment practices. Some of the potential pitfalls in this area stem from discriminatory hiring practices, improper performance evaluations, and retaliatory firings.  less -
News & Analysis as of

Employment Flash (June 2014)

In This Issue: - NLRB Recess Appointments Unconstitutional - SEC Brings First-Ever Employment Retaliation Claim - EEOC Challenges Employer Severance Agreements - New York State Transportation Industry...more

50 for 50: Five Decades of the Most Important Discrimination Law Developments - Number 37: The Supreme Court Raises The Bar On...

Throughout this series, we have discussed how common retaliation claims have become and how challenging the courts have found it to define “causation” in the context of Title VII cases. Those two trends intersected recently...more

Two Supreme Court Rulings Improve Employer's Ability to Defend Against Harassment, Retaliation Claims

On June 24, 2013, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down two critical decisions regarding Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, which improve an employer’s ability to defend against employee claims of harassment and retaliation. ...more

Supreme Court Narrows Scope Of Employer’s Liability For Title VII Claims Against Co-workers

On June 24, 2013 in the case Vance v. Ball State University, the Supreme Court defined the scope of supervisory status as it applies to harassing co-workers under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 (“Title VII”). ...more

Supreme Court Ruling Defines "Supervisor" and Gives Clarity, Peace of Mind to Employers

Last month the U.S. Supreme Court adopted a bright-line standard for determining which employees qualify as supervisors in harassment lawsuits filed under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, thus resolving a split in the...more

California Employment Law Notes - July 2013

Employee Must Prove That Illegal Retaliation Was The "But For" Cause Of Adverse Job Action Under Title VII - University of Tex. S.W. Med. Ctr. v. Nassar, 570 U.S. ___, 2013 WL 3155234 (2013) - The United States...more

Your Greatest Risk: Retaliation Claims

Let’s start with the statistics. Last year, there were 99,412 EEOC charges filed; 37,836 of them – more than one out of every three – asserted retaliation. Put differently, more charges of retaliation were filed than any...more

Recent Supreme Court Cases Raise Bar for Plaintiffs Under Title VII

Two cases decided by the U.S. Supreme Court at the end of its 2012-13 term, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center v. Nassar and Vance v. Ball State University, will significantly alter the landscape of employment...more

Employment Law -- Jul 03, 2013

Excerpt from Supreme Court Sides With Employers in Title VII Suits - Capping off a term of big decisions with employer-friendly results, the U.S. Supreme Court weighed in on two major employment issues in a pair of...more

Words that Make or Break a Client Relationship

In a week of landmark rulings on same-sex marriage and voting rights, it was easy to miss a significant employment law decision issues by the U.S. Supreme Court. That is doubly true in California, where plaintiffs prefer...more

Employment And Labor Insight: Employers Win Big Before The U.S. Supreme Court

As the United States Supreme Court wraps up its term, employers should take note of three decisions issued this past Monday, June 24....more

Employers Prevail In Two U.S. Supreme Court Decisions

The U.S. Supreme Court issued two closely watched decisions Monday affecting Title VII cases....more

Two Major Supreme Court Wins for Employers

On Monday, June 24, 2013, the Supreme Court issued two 5-4 rulings in important cases affecting the employment world, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center v. Nassar and Vance v. Ball State University. By making it...more

Legal Alert: Supreme Court Sets Heightened Standard For Proving Retaliation Claims

On June 24, 2013, the United States Supreme Court heightened the burden of proof for employees bringing retaliation claims under Title VII by holding that employees have to prove that the employer's desire to retaliate was...more

Supreme Court Issues Important Affirmative Action And Employment Law Decisions

This week the Supreme Court issued three decisions that may significantly impact federal contractors and other employers: In Fisher v. University of Texas, No. 11-345 (U.S. June 24, 2013), the Supreme Court held that a...more

U.S. Supreme Court Declines to Loosen Causation Standards for Employee Retaliation Claims in University of Texas Southwestern...

On June 24, 2013, the Supreme Court rejected a lower standard of proof for employee retaliation claims under Title VII, finding that a lower causation standard could tempt poorly performing employees to file frivolous claims...more

Supreme Court Issues Two Title VII Decisions Favorable For Employers

At our recent Labor and Employment Law Seminar, we highlighted a number of outstanding legal cases that have the potential to have a significant impact on employer liability. ...more

Doubling Down: Supreme Court Issues Two Key Rulings Regarding Civil Rights Act Of 1964

On Monday, the Supreme Court of the United States issued two important opinions for employers facing liability and retaliation claims brought under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 ("Title VII")....more

Employees Asserting Retaliation Must Meet Higher Causation Standard, Supreme Court Rules

The explosion of retaliation claims may skid to a halt or at least slow down after the Supreme Court's decision this week holding that plaintiffs making Title VII retaliation claims must establish that their protected...more

Supreme Court Issues Two Employer-Friendly Title VII Decisions

The U.S. Supreme Court yesterday issued two Title VII decisions favorable to employers. One case examined the definition of a supervisor under the anti-discrimination laws, and the other dealt with an employee’s burden of...more

"But for" causation must be used in Title VII retaliation cases, U.S. Supreme Court says

Title VII retaliation claims must be proven according to traditional “but for” causation principles, and not the less strict “motivating factor” standard applicable to other claims under the Statute, the U.S. Supreme Court...more

U.S. Supreme Court Issues Two Key Title VII Rulings

On June 24, 2013, the Supreme Court of the United States issued two highly-anticipated decisions. In Vance v. Ball State University, the justices considered whether the “supervisor” liability rule established by Supreme Court...more

Two Important New Employment Decisions from the U.S. Supreme Court

The United States Supreme Court issued two long awaited and employer friendly decisions today. Both relate to issues raised under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. ...more

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