The National Labor Relations Act Facebook Social Media Policy

The National Labor Relations Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1935 to prevent labor strife by encouraging collective bargaining, protecting concerted activity and curtailing certain unfair labor... more +
The National Labor Relations Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1935 to prevent labor strife by encouraging collective bargaining, protecting concerted activity and curtailing certain unfair labor practices by private sector managament and labor.  less -
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Why after-hours social media posts can still spell on-the-job trouble

Many people think that only teenagers and twentysomethings are using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Google Plus to interact with others. Not so....more

What’s Good for the Goose…

Over the past few years, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has taken issue with employers that discipline employees over Facebook and other social media postings. The NLRB allows employees to discuss wages and other...more

NLRB Ruling in Social Media Case Provides Useful Guidance for Employers

Drafting a social media policy in compliance with Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA” or “the Act”) has become increasingly challenging for employers, as the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “the...more

Quirky Question #279: Concerted Activity in 140 Characters or Less

Question: I am a manager in a medium-sized retailer that has locations and employees in 16 states. The company maintains a social media policy, which was recently updated. ...more

Second Circuit “Likes” Where NLRB Shakes Out on Social Media: Finds that Facebook “Likes” and Obscenity-Riddled Posts Were...

A unanimous panel of the Second Circuit recently upheld the NLRB’s well-publicized Facebook “Like” decision, which found that a sports bar violated the National Labor Relations Act when it terminated two employees for...more

Where’s the “Dislike” Button? 2nd Circuit Affirms Employee-Friendly Social Media Ruling

In my last post on HR legalist, I outlined the current state of the law regarding employee social media use. One trend I have been following is the National Labor Relations Board’s expansion of protections for employees who...more

Second Circuit Sides With NLRB In Facebook Dispute

As employees continue to flock to social media in droves, employers have been craving additional guidance about how, if at all, they can regulate work-related posts. While it is no secret that employees in unionized and...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB's Triple Play Decision, Expanding Section 7 Protections for Employees' Social Media Activity

Obscenities alone—even when viewed by an employer's customers—do not deprive employees engaged in protected concerted activity of the National Labor Relations Act's ("NLRA" or the "Act") protections. So held the U.S. Court...more

Court “Likes” NLRB’s Determination that Facebook Posts Are Protected under the NLRA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that employees’ Facebook posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB Decision: Discharge of Employees for Facebook “Likes” Was Unlawful

On October 22, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille (Employer) violated Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations...more

Second Circuit Says Facebook Profanity Directed at Employer is Protected - Employer Violated NLRA by Terminating Two Employees...

In Three D, LLC d/b/a/ Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. NLRB, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board's (the Board) determination that the employer, Triple Play,...more

Dislike Employees’ Facebook “Likes”? Fire Away at Your Own Risk

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the ruling of the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”) decision in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grill, 361 NLRB No. 31 (2014). The employer, Triple Play, had...more

Socially Aware: The Social Media Law Update Volume 6, Issue 4

Five social media law issues to discuss with your clients - The explosive growth of social media has clients facing legal questions that didn’t even exist a few short years ago. Helping your clients navigate this...more

Hold that Friend Request: Legal Traps in a Post-Facebook Work Environment

Many well-meaning managers engage with employees on social media websites, and doing so provides a host of benefits: stronger relationships between employees and management; a sense of collegiality; instant updates on...more

Will the Second Circuit “Like” the NLRB’s Recent Stance on Social Media? An Update on the Facebook “Like” Firing Case

The NLRB last week filed its brief at the Second Circuit Court of Appeals in the well-publicized Facebook “Like” firing case, Three D, LLC v. NLRB. Prior to the appeal, we discussed the NLRB’s August 2014 ruling here as part...more

Employer beware: NLRA rulings often conflict with existing employer policies

One of the biggest misconceptions employers have is that the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) only applies to unionized employers. As a result, employers may hear of an adverse ruling from the National Labor Relations...more

The National Labor Relations Board 2014 Year in Review - Overview of the Board's Significant Actions

Introduction - If the National Labor Relations Board seemed to be on the ropes in 2013, it certainly came out swinging in 2014. Last year, we reported that the Board faced a number of serious legal battles. Although...more

NLRB Shows Some Restraint in its Protection of Employee Social Media Communications: Employee Termination Arising From “Egregious”...

In the wake of the NLRB’s aggressive crackdown on social media policies, many employers have asked: “Is there any limit to what employees can post on social media about their employers?” It appears that there is. Just last...more

NLRB Finds Facebook Posts Go Too Far for the Act's Protection

As we reported previously, social media issues are troublesome for employers who must navigate unsettled or even conflicting federal and state laws and decisions. A recent ruling from the National Labor Relations Board...more

NLRB: Facebook “Like” is Protected, Concerted Activity Under the Labor Act

The NLRB recently issued another case on employer social media policies, ruling that clicking Facebook’s “Like” button can constitute “protected, concerted” employee activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA)....more

NLRB Continues Aggressive Crackdown on Social Media Policies

In the past few years the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has taken an increased interest in whether workplace policies prohibiting employees from discussing the terms and conditions of their employment on social...more

What's in a "Like"? Precedent-Setting Case Poses New Risk for Employers

The ubiquitous thumbs-up icon in Facebook has gained new prominence for private employers. In a case of first impression, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit held that an employee fired for "liking" the campaign...more

Social Media in the Workplace -- A New Web of Regulations Falls on Employers

Employers with a non-union workforce may be surprised to learn that their non-supervisory employees have legal protections enforced by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). The NLRB has recently taken an aggressive...more

Party Foul! NLRB Orders Reinstatement and Back Pay for Party Bus Guide After Finding Facebook Postings Amount To Protected Union...

Providing yet another example of how online social networking can amount to protected conduct under the National Labor Relations Act, the NLRB ruled earlier this month in New York Party Shuttle, LLC and Fred Pflantzer, CN:...more

Social Media in the Workplace – Employers Must Now Comply With Strict NLRB Oversight

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA” or the “Act”), 29 USC § 157, protects both union and non-union employees who form, join and assist labor unions, participate in collective bargaining, and engage in “other...more

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