The National Labor Relations Act Facebook Social Media Policy

The National Labor Relations Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1935 to prevent labor strife by encouraging collective bargaining, protecting concerted activity and curtailing certain unfair labor... more +
The National Labor Relations Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1935 to prevent labor strife by encouraging collective bargaining, protecting concerted activity and curtailing certain unfair labor practices by private sector managament and labor.  less -
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What's in a "Like"? Precedent-Setting Case Poses New Risk for Employers

The ubiquitous thumbs-up icon in Facebook has gained new prominence for private employers. In a case of first impression, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit held that an employee fired for "liking" the campaign...more

Social Media in the Workplace -- A New Web of Regulations Falls on Employers

Employers with a non-union workforce may be surprised to learn that their non-supervisory employees have legal protections enforced by the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). The NLRB has recently taken an aggressive...more

Social Media Legal Risks for Nonprofits: How to Successfully Navigate the Pitfalls

In this presentation: - How Does Social Media Work For You? - When Social Media Works Against You - Others’ IP - The Pinterest Question: “ But, What About Fair Use?” - Argh, so many...more

Party Foul! NLRB Orders Reinstatement and Back Pay for Party Bus Guide After Finding Facebook Postings Amount To Protected Union...

Providing yet another example of how online social networking can amount to protected conduct under the National Labor Relations Act, the NLRB ruled earlier this month in New York Party Shuttle, LLC and Fred Pflantzer, CN:...more

Social Media in the Workplace – Employers Must Now Comply With Strict NLRB Oversight

Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA” or the “Act”), 29 USC § 157, protects both union and non-union employees who form, join and assist labor unions, participate in collective bargaining, and engage in “other...more

Tweet, Follow, Or Get Out Of The Way: What All Employers Need To Know About Social Media In The Workplace

Facebook. Twitter. LinkedIn. YouTube. Blogs. Email. Texts. Social media in the workplace has become a fact of life for all employers. Companies are learning that these once feared social media sites can be powerful marketing...more

National Labor Relations Board on Employer Social Media Policies

As use of social media continues to increase, so do concerns by employers regarding employee use of social media as it relates to the workplace. In response, many employers are drafting new or revised policies covering use of...more

Social Media Policies And The NLRB: What Employers Need To Know

Social media policies. Chances are your company has one, is in the process of drafting one, or is worried about not having one. Employees continue to gripe about their jobs and their bosses on Facebook, as states like...more

The National Labor Relations Board 2012 Year in Review

Introduction - Wow, 2012 was quite the year for the National Labor Relations Board (“Board”)! Last year, we discussed the Board’s agenda, which at the time we described as aggressive, but with the benefit of...more

NLRB Issues Pair of Decisions Limiting Employer Discipline and Policies Regarding Social Media

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently issued a pair of decisions helping to clarify the limits on employers’ ability to (1) discipline employees for their social media activities and (2) implement confidentiality...more

NLRB: Use of Social Media Can Be Protected Employee Activity

The rise of social media has led to the application of old law to new forms of communication. For instance, an effort by the National Labor Relations Board to educate workers on their right to engage in protected concerted...more

Labor Letter, January 2013: Has The NLRB Outlawed Courtesy?

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has attracted attention in recent years for its scrutiny of employer rules and policies regulating conduct of employees – including employees who are not represented by unions or...more

What Some Would Call Harassment, The NLRB Calls Protected Concerted Activity

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) issued its latest opinion on the scope of employees’ Section 7 rights while posting on social media sites like Facebook. Hispanics United of Buffalo, which involved the...more

NLRB Confirms that Comments Posted on Social Media May Be Entitled to Protection

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently issued a significant decision - solidifying the position it has staked out over the past 18 months - that an employee’s posts on social media may be entitled to protection...more

NLRB Sides with Employees Fired over Facebook Posts

In its second opinion addressing employee terminations resulting from Facebook posts, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has ordered an employer to reinstate five employees terminated for posting Facebook comments in...more

NLRB Tackles Social Media Policies and a Firing Related to a Facebook Posting

This article addresses two recent National Labor Relations Board decisions. The first found the electronic posting rules of Costco Wholesale Corp. overly broad. The second found a “courtesy rule” of car dealership Karl Knauz...more

NLRB Decisions Continue to Proscribe Social Media and Other Policies If They Could Arguably Be Construed to Limit Protected...

Employers that have or are considering instituting social media or civility policies may want to pay attention to two National Labor Relations Board (NLRB; the Board) decisions issued in September 2012....more

Social Media Update - The NLRB Upholds Employer-Friendly Ruling in First Decision Involving Firing Over a Facebook Posting

As a powerful tool to reach a wide audience and a vehicle for users to reveal otherwise private information, social media creates fertile ground for litigation, particularly in the employment and labor context. In the first...more

NLRB Says Facebook Firing is Lawful, But Social Media Policy is Not

The National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) recently issued its first decision regarding an employee’s termination due to posts on Facebook. The decision, a mixed bag for employers, demonstrates—again—the NLRB’s increasing...more

First NLRB Decisions on Social Media Give Employers Cause to Update Policies, Practices

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) recently issued its first two rulings on employer social media policies and its first ruling on an employee’s termination due to posts on Facebook. These rulings are significant for...more

Update: NLRB Upholds Termination For Facebook Posting, But Nails Employer For Unrelated Handbook Policy

The NLRB has received a lot of attention for its actions the last couple years. One of the storms was caused by the agency’s attention to employer actions based on employee Facebook postings. More to the point, employers were...more

Employee’s Facebook Posting Not Protected Activity, Says NLRB

The National Labor Relations Board’s most recent decision demonstrates that not all employee social media posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act. Questions remain, however, about the extent to which employees...more

NLRB Strikes Down Employee Handbook Language and Issues First Social Media Decision

Continuing its aggressive foray into nonunion workplaces, the NLRB has weighed in on social media and employee handbook issues, finding certain language to be unlawful under Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations...more

NLRB Upholds Employee's Discharge In First Facebook-Related Decision

Executive Summary: In its first published decision involving employee Facebook access, the National Labor Relations Board has upheld the termination of an employee whose Facebook posts mocked an accident on his employer's...more

NLRB Keeps Doing What It Always Does. Why Is Anyone Surprised?

I’ll admit something that might seem a little unusual and ironic: I’ve grown a bit tired about writing about the NLRB and social media. Perhaps, it’s because I’ve seen too many law firms and lawyers issuing...more

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