The National Labor Relations Act Social Media

The National Labor Relations Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1935 to prevent labor strife by encouraging collective bargaining, protecting concerted activity and curtailing certain unfair labor... more +
The National Labor Relations Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1935 to prevent labor strife by encouraging collective bargaining, protecting concerted activity and curtailing certain unfair labor practices by private sector managament and labor.  less -
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Best Practices in Social Media for Employers Part 3 – Disciplining Employees for Conduct on Social Media

As discussed previously (see Best Practices in Social Media for Employers Part 2), adopting a National Labor Relations Act (NLRA)-compliant social media policy is the first step in ensuring that the policy can be enforced. ...more

Best Practices in Social Media for Employers Part 2 – Monitoring Employees’ Social Media Use

In addition to the risks associated with employers’ use of social media as related to the recruiting and the hiring process, employers should also be aware of potential pitfalls associated with restricting or monitoring...more

Workplace Challenges in 2015, Part 2 of 5: Continued Focus on Social Media Policies That the NLRB Will Endorse

During our workplace privacy segment, our presenters, Mintz Levin attorneys Cynthia Larose and Richard Block, and Vice President, Deputy General Counsel of Time, Inc., Michelle Goldstein, addressed several issues that...more

The National Labor Relations Board: 2014 Year in Review - The NLRB's Expansion of Employee Rights Under the National Labor...

In 2014, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or Board) scrutinized employer policies and practices, protected employee use of social media and employers' email systems to organize and engage in protected concerted...more

The National Labor Relations Board 2014 Year in Review - Overview of the Board's Significant Actions

Introduction - If the National Labor Relations Board seemed to be on the ropes in 2013, it certainly came out swinging in 2014. Last year, we reported that the Board faced a number of serious legal battles. Although...more

In with the New: 2015 Privacy, Advertising and Digital Media Predictions – Part II

More predictions about privacy, advertising and digital media trends making headlines in 2015 from Of Digital Interest editor Bridget O’Connell and predictions from our London office by Rob Lister...more

“Egregious” Insubordinate Facebook Post not Protected by NLRA

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) upheld a San Francisco nonprofit’s decision not to rehire two employees due to their Facebook conversation. In Richmond District Neighborhood Center, the nonprofit ran an...more

#Insubordination: NLRB Affirms Refusal To Re-Hire Employees Based Upon Facebook Exchange

In prior articles, we have discussed various decisions by the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or the “Board”) protecting employee social media activity as concerted activity under Section 7 the National Labor Relations...more

Employers Finally Win NLRB Facebook Case

Over the past several years, EmployNews has dutifully reported decision after decision from the National Labor Relations Board concluding that employees’ use of Facebook and other social media sites to complain about work,...more

NLRB Says On-Line Planning For Insubordination Is Not Protected Concerted Activity

In Richmond District Neighborhood Center, Case 20-CA-091748 (Oct. 28, 2014), the Board upheld an Administrative Law Judge’s ruling that a conversation between two employees, who were involved with student programming at the...more

NLRB Shows Some Restraint in its Protection of Employee Social Media Communications: Employee Termination Arising From “Egregious”...

In the wake of the NLRB’s aggressive crackdown on social media policies, many employers have asked: “Is there any limit to what employees can post on social media about their employers?” It appears that there is. Just last...more

What’s in a Like?

In the pre-Facebook era, the word “like” was primarily a verb (and an interjection sprinkled throughout valley girls’ conversations). Although you could have likes and dislikes in the sense of preferences, you could not give...more

NLRB Upholds Employee Terminations for Facebook Rant

A few weeks ago, I wrote a blog post about the recent line of NLRB cases examining what constitutes “protected, concerted” activity in the context of employees engaging in profane, insulting, or disrespectful conduct or talk...more

NLRB Finds Facebook Posts Go Too Far for the Act's Protection

As we reported previously, social media issues are troublesome for employers who must navigate unsettled or even conflicting federal and state laws and decisions. A recent ruling from the National Labor Relations Board...more

NLRB Rules that Facebook “Likes” are Protected By Labor Law

One provision of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) states that employees are protected from any form of employer retaliation when they commit “concerted protected activity,” which essentially means any form of activity...more

Employers, Take Your Heads Out of the Sand when it Comes to Social Media…

If it’s not mandatory or poses a threat to the very existence of an organization and its economic survival, employers will keep their heads in the sand pleading ignorance, while remaining apathetic. It’s kind of like my...more

Inside or Outside? How to Best Perform Your Company’s Social Media Background Check

No employer wants its employee’s bad behavior at work to become the next viral video. So it is not surprising that more employers have started using social media in the hiring process to screen out candidates who post...more

NLRB Continues Aggressive Crackdown on Social Media Policies

In the past few years the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has taken an increased interest in whether workplace policies prohibiting employees from discussing the terms and conditions of their employment on social...more

NLRB “Unfriends” Employer Over Facebook “Like”

On August 25, the National Labor Relations Board found in Three D, LLC, d/b/a Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. Sanzone, Case No. 34-CA-012915, and Three D, LLC, d/b/a Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. Spinella, Case...more

Employers Are Not Going to "Like" This NLRB Decision on Social Media

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has issued yet another decision which should cause all employers, even those without unions, to think very carefully before disciplining any employee for their actions on social...more

NLRB's Recent Triple Play Decision Tackles Two Critical Social Media Issues for Employers

With the intersection between cutting-edge social media and the Depression-era National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or the Act) still relatively new, employers are looking for answers to some fundamental questions when it comes...more

Week in Review

The National Labor Relations Board continues to focus on employer social media policies and employee discipline for online activity. In a ruling this week involving Triple Play Sports Bar & Grill, the Board concluded that...more

Lessons on Social Media in the Workplace

The following is a guest blog post by Tyler M. Paetkau, a partner with Hartnett, Smith & Paetkau in Redwood City. Tyler represents employers in all aspects of labor and employment law. He’s a frequent author and speaker on...more

Enforcing Your Policies Outside The Workplace

All employers adopt and enforce policies regulating conduct at the workplace. Many employers expect that employees will follow their employment polices at all times regardless of whether the employee is working or at work....more

NLRB Administrative Law Judge Rulings on Work Rules and Social Media Policies Continue to Perplex

The NLRB may be getting #SocialMedia, but confusion concerning employer work rules and social media policies became obvious yet again in Professional Electrical Contractors of Connecticut (June 4, 2014). In this decision, ALJ...more

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