The National Labor Relations Act Social Media

The National Labor Relations Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1935 to prevent labor strife by encouraging collective bargaining, protecting concerted activity and curtailing certain unfair labor... more +
The National Labor Relations Act is a United States federal statute enacted in 1935 to prevent labor strife by encouraging collective bargaining, protecting concerted activity and curtailing certain unfair labor practices by private sector managament and labor.  less -
News & Analysis as of

Data Privacy Recommendations for Crafting Employee Monitoring Policies

Federal laws prohibit the interception of another’s electronic communications, but these same laws have multiple exceptions that generally allow employers to monitor employees’ email and internet use on employer-owned...more

The Second Circuit Tackles Employee Rights, Obscenities & Social Media Use

Employers took note last year when the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) ruled that “liking” a Facebook post can qualify as protected activity under the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). The NLRB held that the owner of...more

Second Circuit Holds That Facebook “Like” May Be Concerted Activity Under Section 7 of the NLRA

The Second Circuit recently released a summary order in Three D, LLC v. NLRB affirming the National Labor Relations Board’s (the Board) ruling that a Facebook “like” can be construed as concerted activity under Section 7 of...more

"Likes" on Facebook are Protected Employee Conduct

The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit recently upheld a National Labor Relations Board (Board) decision holding that a sports bar violated the National Labor Relations Act (Act) when it discharged...more

The Second Circuit “Likes” the NLRB’s Reasoning

In recent years, the National Labor Relations Board has tended to protect employees’ social media activity against employers. A few weeks ago, the Second Circuit upheld a decision of the National Labor Relations Board...more

Employment Law - November 2015

Following California, New York Toughens Equal Pay Law - Why it matters: Following in the recent footsteps of California, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo signed into law the Achieve Pay Equality Act, providing greater...more

Where’s the “Dislike” Button? 2nd Circuit Affirms Employee-Friendly Social Media Ruling

In my last post on HR legalist, I outlined the current state of the law regarding employee social media use. One trend I have been following is the National Labor Relations Board’s expansion of protections for employees who...more

Discipline Based on Social Media Activity – An Update

Social media is no longer trendy. It’s commonplace, and so is discipline imposed because an employee posts something inappropriate. According to a Proskauer survey, 70 percent of employers report taking disciplinary action...more

Court “Likes” NLRB’s determination that Facebook posts are protected under the NLRA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that employees’ Facebook posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play...more

Second Circuit Sides With NLRB In Facebook Dispute

As employees continue to flock to social media in droves, employers have been craving additional guidance about how, if at all, they can regulate work-related posts. While it is no secret that employees in unionized and...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB's Triple Play Decision, Expanding Section 7 Protections for Employees' Social Media Activity

Obscenities alone—even when viewed by an employer's customers—do not deprive employees engaged in protected concerted activity of the National Labor Relations Act's ("NLRA" or the "Act") protections. So held the U.S. Court...more

Court “Likes” NLRB’s Determination that Facebook Posts Are Protected under the NLRA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that employees’ Facebook posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB Decision: Discharge of Employees for Facebook “Likes” Was Unlawful

On October 22, 2015, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals affirmed the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille (Employer) violated Section 8(a)(1) of the National Labor Relations...more

Second Circuit Says Facebook Profanity Directed at Employer is Protected - Employer Violated NLRA by Terminating Two Employees...

In Three D, LLC d/b/a/ Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. NLRB, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board's (the Board) determination that the employer, Triple Play,...more

Second Circuit Finds Facebook “Likes” Protected Under NLRA

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit clarified in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. National Labor Relations Board that protections provided under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA”) encompass...more

Facebook “Like” Protected Speech Under the NLRA

We all have them. Friends and family who overshare on Facebook. Their food choices (complete with pictures), exercise routine, and relationship drama, all solidified in the form of a status update. Annoying maybe, but mostly...more

Second Circuit Upholds That Facebook "Likes" Can Be Protected, Concerted Activity

On October 21, 2015, the Second Circuit upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) earlier ruling that clicking the Facebook “Like” button can be protected concerted activity. The Triple Play Sports Bar & Grill fired...more

“Like” It or Not, It’s Protected Activity Under the NLRA

If I’ve heard it once, I’ve heard it a million times: “It’s employment at will in this state. I can fire my employees for any reason or no reason at all.” Well, if that “any reason” or “no reason” has something to do with...more

That is SO last week - October 2015 #4

Last week, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals issued its summary decision in Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille. Affirming the National Labor Relations Board, the Court held that an employee’s Facebook comments about working...more

Your Employees’ Bad Behavior on Social Media Can Have Workplace Consequences

Notwithstanding that the people involved are often surprised at their public exposure, it has become somewhat commonplace for individuals to be either caught on video by a smartphone or to have a social media website posting...more

Socially Aware: The Social Media Law Update Volume 6, Issue 4

Five social media law issues to discuss with your clients - The explosive growth of social media has clients facing legal questions that didn’t even exist a few short years ago. Helping your clients navigate this...more

Blocked: Managing Social Media at Work Under Virginia’s New Privacy Law

With social media pervading all facets of society (no less than 67 percent of Americans are regular users), businesses have long been concerned with their employees’ potentially detrimental social media activities. As these...more

eWorkplace Policies Restricting Employees’ Acceptable Use of Technology, Social Media & The Cloud

I. OVERVIEW – THE MODERN LANDSCAPE - A. Physical Conduct PLUS Digital Activity - Traditional concerns for employers have included: conduct leading to liability to third-parties; “frolic and detour” or other...more

Hold that Friend Request: Legal Traps in a Post-Facebook Work Environment

Many well-meaning managers engage with employees on social media websites, and doing so provides a host of benefits: stronger relationships between employees and management; a sense of collegiality; instant updates on...more

The NLRB Expands Its Reach in the Non-Union Workplace

The National Labor Relations Board continues to infiltrate the workplace even where there are no unions. Standard workplace policies — including those relating to employee conduct, protecting intellectual property, use of...more

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