National Labor Relations Board Social Media Policy The National Labor Relations Act

The National Labor Relations Board is an independent agency of the United States federal government created in 1935 as part of the National Labor Relations Act. The Board consists of five presidentially-appointed... more +
The National Labor Relations Board is an independent agency of the United States federal government created in 1935 as part of the National Labor Relations Act. The Board consists of five presidentially-appointed members, who are charged with overseeing union elections and hearing complaints of unfair labor practices under the NLRA.    less -
News & Analysis as of

5 Key Takeaways from My Long List of Regulatory Changes Shared at ECVC2016

As 2016 draws to a close with a major political transition underway in Washington, D.C., organizations already dealing with a rapidly evolving regulatory environment now face uncertainty regarding whether some of the new...more

Even Non-Union Employers Must Consider the National Labor Relations Act When Drafting Social Media Policies

While employers should enact social media policies to protect trade secrets and prevent employees from defaming the employer, employers must ensure the policies do not violate the National Labor Relations Act (“Act”). Even...more

Why after-hours social media posts can still spell on-the-job trouble

Many people think that only teenagers and twentysomethings are using Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Snapchat, Pinterest, LinkedIn and Google Plus to interact with others. Not so....more

What’s Good for the Goose…

Over the past few years, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has taken issue with employers that discipline employees over Facebook and other social media postings. The NLRB allows employees to discuss wages and other...more

NLRB Loses Its Lunch Over Chipotle’s Social Media Policy

On August 18, 2016, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) affirmed an administrative law judge’s (ALJ) March 14, 2016 ruling that Chipotle’s “Social Media Code of Conduct” violated the National Labor Relations Act...more

Employer Handbook Policies Violate the National Labor Relations Act

As we recently noted, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) is laser-like focused on scrutinizing employer personnel policies. In yet another example of this ongoing campaign, a recent administrative law judge (ALJ)...more

NLRB Ruling in Social Media Case Provides Useful Guidance for Employers

Drafting a social media policy in compliance with Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (“NLRA” or “the Act”) has become increasingly challenging for employers, as the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or “the...more

#Fired: Post a Tweet, Lose Your Job

Many people enjoy spouting off what they view as 140-character tidbits of wisdom on the social media platform Twitter. But recently several individuals have found themselves in trouble with their employers (read: former...more

NLRB Tells Employers to Mind their Own Business

Seyfarth Synopsis: An Administrative Law Judge held that an employer’s policy of prohibiting employees from conducting personal business at work, along with its social media and solicitation/distribution policies, violated...more

Guidance On Handbooks, Policies, And Social Media Guidelines – Employers’ Attempts to Protect Themselves Too Much Can Lead to Loss...

Seyfarth Synopsis: The NLRB orders employer to cease and desist from maintaining numerous provisions in its Social Networking Guideline and provisions in the Handbook related to social media, privacy, and confidentiality, and...more

An Unfair Employer Policy Roundup to Help Avoid Unfair Labor Practices

For the past few years, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) has been on the warpath over employer personnel policies (and in turn, we at Labor & Employment Law Perspectives have missed few opportunities to point out the...more

The NLRB Continues to Monitor Social Media Policies

According to this EmployNews report, the National Labor Relations Board continues to interpret the National Labor Relations Act to prohibit social media policies that restrict employees’ ability to publically complain about...more

Quirky Question #279: Concerted Activity in 140 Characters or Less

Question: I am a manager in a medium-sized retailer that has locations and employees in 16 states. The company maintains a social media policy, which was recently updated. ...more

Off the Record? Workplace Perils of Video Recording and Social Media

By Scott Rabe and Samuel Sverdlov Seyfarth Synopsis: With seemingly every employee having access to a smart-phone or other recording device, employers without strong social media policies may be placing themselves at greater...more

Social Media Policy Cannot Prevent Employee from Negative Responses to Customer Tweets

The National Labor Relations Board continues to interpret Section 7 of the NLRA to prevent employers from adopting social media policies that restrict employees’ ability to publically complain about their terms and conditions...more

Legal Risks with Managing Employees in the Social Media Era

Social media continues to be a growing platform for applicants, employees, and employers to use for marketing, company branding, and employee engagement. As with any computer technology, the use of social media in the...more

A Recipe for Burrito Disaster: Twitter and the NLRA

In Havertown, Pennsylvania, Chipotle recently had some negative publicity and, for once, E. coli was not the culprit. Instead, James Kennedy, a 38-year-old war veteran, was terminated from Chipotle, after criticizing the...more

Further Insights: How the Recent Barbulescu Decision Impacts Employers in Europe and the United States

Last month, we blogged about the much discussed ECHR Barbulescu opinion. As a follow up, we wanted to provide further insights to multi-national employers about how this European decision compares to the position in the...more

Technology, Guns and the NLRB – Get Ready for 2016

Happy New Year! To help ring in the New Year and pin down last-minute New Year’s resolutions, let’s look at six topics impacting the workplace in 2016...more

Second Circuit “Likes” Where NLRB Shakes Out on Social Media: Finds that Facebook “Likes” and Obscenity-Riddled Posts Were...

A unanimous panel of the Second Circuit recently upheld the NLRB’s well-publicized Facebook “Like” decision, which found that a sports bar violated the National Labor Relations Act when it terminated two employees for...more

Where’s the “Dislike” Button? 2nd Circuit Affirms Employee-Friendly Social Media Ruling

In my last post on HR legalist, I outlined the current state of the law regarding employee social media use. One trend I have been following is the National Labor Relations Board’s expansion of protections for employees who...more

Discipline Based on Social Media Activity – An Update

Social media is no longer trendy. It’s commonplace, and so is discipline imposed because an employee posts something inappropriate. According to a Proskauer survey, 70 percent of employers report taking disciplinary action...more

Second Circuit Sides With NLRB In Facebook Dispute

As employees continue to flock to social media in droves, employers have been craving additional guidance about how, if at all, they can regulate work-related posts. While it is no secret that employees in unionized and...more

Second Circuit Upholds NLRB's Triple Play Decision, Expanding Section 7 Protections for Employees' Social Media Activity

Obscenities alone—even when viewed by an employer's customers—do not deprive employees engaged in protected concerted activity of the National Labor Relations Act's ("NLRA" or the "Act") protections. So held the U.S. Court...more

Court “Likes” NLRB’s Determination that Facebook Posts Are Protected under the NLRA

The Second Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld the National Labor Relations Board’s (NLRB) decision that employees’ Facebook posts are protected by the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA). Three D, LLC d/b/a Triple Play...more

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