National Labor Relations Board Social Media

The National Labor Relations Board is an independent agency of the United States federal government created in 1935 as part of the National Labor Relations Act. The Board consists of five presidentially-appointed... more +
The National Labor Relations Board is an independent agency of the United States federal government created in 1935 as part of the National Labor Relations Act. The Board consists of five presidentially-appointed members, who are charged with overseeing union elections and hearing complaints of unfair labor practices under the NLRA.    less -
News & Analysis as of

Employment Law - November 2014

State Voters Pass Paid Sick Leave, Wage Increases - Why it matters: The polls have closed and the votes are in: The midterm elections will have a significant impact on employers across the country as voters in multiple...more

Teach Appropriate Speech - Or risk liability for employees' derogatory on-line comments about customers

Recent District of Hawaii decision suggests social media policies are more important than ever, despite NLRB’s dramatic limits on employers’ ability to police employee speech on the Internet - Howard v. Hertz -...more

#Insubordination: NLRB Affirms Refusal To Re-Hire Employees Based Upon Facebook Exchange

In prior articles, we have discussed various decisions by the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB” or the “Board”) protecting employee social media activity as concerted activity under Section 7 the National Labor Relations...more

Employers Finally Win NLRB Facebook Case

Over the past several years, EmployNews has dutifully reported decision after decision from the National Labor Relations Board concluding that employees’ use of Facebook and other social media sites to complain about work,...more

NLRB Says On-Line Planning For Insubordination Is Not Protected Concerted Activity

In Richmond District Neighborhood Center, Case 20-CA-091748 (Oct. 28, 2014), the Board upheld an Administrative Law Judge’s ruling that a conversation between two employees, who were involved with student programming at the...more

NLRB Shows Some Restraint in its Protection of Employee Social Media Communications: Employee Termination Arising From “Egregious”...

In the wake of the NLRB’s aggressive crackdown on social media policies, many employers have asked: “Is there any limit to what employees can post on social media about their employers?” It appears that there is. Just last...more

What’s in a Like?

In the pre-Facebook era, the word “like” was primarily a verb (and an interjection sprinkled throughout valley girls’ conversations). Although you could have likes and dislikes in the sense of preferences, you could not give...more

NLRB Upholds Employee Terminations for Facebook Rant

A few weeks ago, I wrote a blog post about the recent line of NLRB cases examining what constitutes “protected, concerted” activity in the context of employees engaging in profane, insulting, or disrespectful conduct or talk...more

NLRB Finds Facebook Posts Go Too Far for the Act's Protection

As we reported previously, social media issues are troublesome for employers who must navigate unsettled or even conflicting federal and state laws and decisions. A recent ruling from the National Labor Relations Board...more

Social Media Policies Revisited: The Facebook “Like” As Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) continues to expand its reach beyond its traditional role involving unionized workforces. In particular, the NLRB has continued an aggressive campaign begun in 2011 to crackdown on...more

Board Continues Aggressive Policing of Employee Social Media Use

Stop me if you heard this one: the National Labor Relations Board recently reinstated employees who were discharged for comments made on their Facebook pages and found that the employer's social media policy was unlawful....more

NLRB Rules that Facebook “Likes” are Protected By Labor Law

One provision of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) states that employees are protected from any form of employer retaliation when they commit “concerted protected activity,” which essentially means any form of activity...more

Do Employees Have the Right to Access Social Media in the Workplace? Can Employers Block Social Media Websites?

A Pew Foundation study earlier this year found that 87% of all adults in the United States access the Internet or email, either through computers or mobile devices. The same study found that of those adults, as many as 74%...more

The NLRB's Latest Digital Developments

Last May, we highlighted a pending National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) case where the Board requested comments on whether it should reconsider its view that employees do not have a statutory right to use employer-owned...more

Employers, Take Your Heads Out of the Sand when it Comes to Social Media…

If it’s not mandatory or poses a threat to the very existence of an organization and its economic survival, employers will keep their heads in the sand pleading ignorance, while remaining apathetic. It’s kind of like my...more

Firing Employees for Critical Facebook Comments May Be Unlawful

Employers can sometimes lawfully fire employees for posting critical comments about their jobs on social media, even if employees post the comments on their own time and on their own equipment. However, that's not always the...more

NLRB Says "Liking" Another Employee's Facebook Comment is Protected Activity

The National Labor Relations Board continues its line of decisions declaring employee social media use as protected concerted activity under Section 7 of the NLRA. Last month in Triple Play Sports Bar & Grille, the Board...more

Inside or Outside? How to Best Perform Your Company’s Social Media Background Check

No employer wants its employee’s bad behavior at work to become the next viral video. So it is not surprising that more employers have started using social media in the hiring process to screen out candidates who post...more

NLRB Continues Aggressive Crackdown on Social Media Policies

In the past few years the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has taken an increased interest in whether workplace policies prohibiting employees from discussing the terms and conditions of their employment on social...more

NLRB “Unfriends” Employer Over Facebook “Like”

On August 25, the National Labor Relations Board found in Three D, LLC, d/b/a Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. Sanzone, Case No. 34-CA-012915, and Three D, LLC, d/b/a Triple Play Sports Bar and Grille v. Spinella, Case...more

Employers Are Not Going to "Like" This NLRB Decision on Social Media

The National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) has issued yet another decision which should cause all employers, even those without unions, to think very carefully before disciplining any employee for their actions on social...more

NLRB's Recent Triple Play Decision Tackles Two Critical Social Media Issues for Employers

With the intersection between cutting-edge social media and the Depression-era National Labor Relations Act (NLRA or the Act) still relatively new, employers are looking for answers to some fundamental questions when it comes...more

Week in Review

The National Labor Relations Board continues to focus on employer social media policies and employee discipline for online activity. In a ruling this week involving Triple Play Sports Bar & Grill, the Board concluded that...more

Lessons on Social Media in the Workplace

The following is a guest blog post by Tyler M. Paetkau, a partner with Hartnett, Smith & Paetkau in Redwood City. Tyler represents employers in all aspects of labor and employment law. He’s a frequent author and speaker on...more

Enforcing Your Policies Outside The Workplace

All employers adopt and enforce policies regulating conduct at the workplace. Many employers expect that employees will follow their employment polices at all times regardless of whether the employee is working or at work....more

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