Patent-Eligible Subject Matter Biotechnology

Patent-Eligible Subject Matter refers to the types of inventions that can be legally patented. The criteria for patentability varies depending on the jurisdiction. In the United States, for instance, if a... more +
Patent-Eligible Subject Matter refers to the types of inventions that can be legally patented. The criteria for patentability varies depending on the jurisdiction. In the United States, for instance, if a researcher discovers a naturally occurring substance, the substance itself cannot be patented. This issue was examined in a United States Supreme Court case, AMP v. Myriad, in regard to the patentability of human genes.  less -
News & Analysis as of

Obama Administration Releases Much Anticipated Text of the Trans-Pacific Partnership Agreement

This client alert examines intellectual property proposals in the Trans-Pacific Partnership from the perspective of biotechnology, pharmaceutical, and chemical industries. On November 5, 2015, the U.S. trade...more

Natera Responds to Sequenom's Petition for Rehearing En Banc

Last week, Appellee Natera, Inc. filed its response to the petition for rehearing en banc filed by Appellants Sequenom, Inc. and Sequenom Center for Molecular Medicine, LLC in August (see "Sequenom Requests Rehearing En...more

What impact will the Australian Myriad decision have on patent eligibility of diagnostic tests?

By now most will know that: (a) Australia’s final appeal Court has made adverse findings against Myriad’s patent for utilising the BRCA1 locus to diagnose breast cancer; (b) the rejected claims are only those that...more

What did the Australian High Court actually say about the patent eligibility of cDNA?

As the dust from the impact of the Australian Myriad decision begins to settle, now is the time to revisit what many have said regarding patent eligibility of cDNA, against what the final appeal Court actually said. On...more

“Does a nucleic acid constitute patent eligible subject matter under Australia law?”

That is the question that we hoped Australia’s final appeal Court to have answered in the Myriad decision that it handed down last week. Some observers have been quite forthright on the point: ‘Yes, the High Court of...more

Does a Nucleic Acid Constitute Patent Eligible Subject Matter Under Australian Law?

Clearly the High Court has given an answer to a question, but was that question the one we anticipated? That in itself is an open question!...more

Australian High Court Rules Gene Patents Unpatentable

Like the United States Supreme Court, the High Court of Australia has determined that Myriad’s patents directed to purified and isolated DNA molecules encoding the BRCA genes are unpatentable. Indeed, the Australian Court...more

News from Abroad: High Court Rules Myriad's BRCA Genes Not Patentable Subject Matter in Australia

Just over one year after the Full Federal Court of Australia unanimously upheld an earlier Federal Court decision that naturally occurring nucleic acid molecules are patentable in Australia, the High Court of Australia has...more

Australia High Court Rules Against Gene Patents

Colleagues in Australia have been spreading the bad news: The High Court of Australia followed the lead (?) of the U.S. Supreme Court and determined that Myriad cannot patent the isolated BRCA1 gene in Australia. Thanks to...more

High Court of Australia determines isolated BRCA1 gene not patentable in Australia

The High Court of Australia has unanimously overturned previous decisions from lower courts and has held that certain claims to Myriad's patent for isolated BRCA1 nucleic acid molecules are not patentable in Australia...more

Amicus Briefs in Support of Sequenom's Petition for Rehearing En Banc: BIO and PhRMA

Earlier this summer, in Ariosa Diagnostics, Inc. v. Sequenom, Inc., the Federal Circuit affirmed a decision by the District Court for the Northern District of California granting summary judgment of invalidity of the asserted...more

Strong Support for Sequenom’s Petition for Rehearing En Banc

In Ariosa Diagnostics Inc. v. Sequenom Inc., 788 F.3d 1371 (Fed. Cir. 2015), a Federal Circuit panel held that Sequenom Inc.’s prenatal diagnosis patent claims patent ineligible subject matter under the two-step test of Mayo...more

Biotech-specific Subject Matter Eligibility Materials Delayed

Pursuant to the Notice published in the Federal Register today, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office provided additional materials related to the Office's interpretation of what does (and what does not) satisfy the subject...more

Federal Circuit Review | July 2015

Nunc Pro Tunc Assignments Insufficient To Confer Retroactive Standing - In ALPS SOUTH, LLC v. OHIO WILLOW WOOD CO., Appeal Nos. 2013-1452, 2013-1488, 2014-1147, and 2014-1426, the Federal Circuit reversed the denial of a...more

Federal Circuit’s Latest Patent Subject Matter Decision in Ariosa v. Sequenom Renders Many Biotech Patents at Risk

On June 12, 2015, the Federal Circuit issued its decision in Ariosa Diagnostics, Inc. v. Sequenom, Inc., finding that Sequenom’s patent claiming methods of using cell-free fetal DNA (“cffDNA”) for prenatal diagnosis test is...more

What Constitutes Patentable Subject Matter in Biotechnology? New Federal Circuit Decision Says “Even Less Than You Thought!”

With its recent (June 12, 2015) decision in Ariosa v. Sequenom, the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit affirmed the Northern District of California’s broad interpretation of the U.S. Supreme Court’s Prometheus v. Mayo...more

Patent for Technology that “Revolutionized Prenatal Care” Nonetheless Invalid as Patent Ineligible

The Federal Circuit Friday held in Ariosa Diagnostics, Inc. v. Sequenom, Inc. that Sequenom’s patent directed toward its MaterniT21 test—involving methods of detecting and using cell-free fetal DNA— was invalid for lack of...more

U.S. Appeals Court Finds Prenatal DNA Test Unpatentable

The United States Court of Appeal for the Federal Circuit in the District of Columbia came down with another blow for the patentability of biotech testing products on Friday, June 12, 2015. The Court affirmed the 2013...more

Refashioning IP Asset Protection Strategies for Biotechnology and BioPharma Clients in View of the New Legal Realities of Subject...

In the 1970s, the biotechnology industry was in its infancy. Many academic researchers were developing faster, more efficient ways to clone and characterize gene products of interest, and companies arose to provide practical...more

Is Biotech Patentable Subject Matter? [Video]

The issue of patent eligibility has been a hotly litigated issue in the field of intellectual property law, and both the Federal Circuit and the Supreme Court have issued numerous decisions in recent years--particularly in...more

More Biotech and Diagnostic Patents At Risk After Federal Circuit Decision

On December 17, 2014, the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals found that certain claims relating to Myriad’s BRCA1 genetic test for breast and ovarian cancer were invalid under 35 U.S.C. § 101 as being ineligible for patent...more

Myriad Disappointments for Biotech, but Hope Remains

CAFC extends the reach of subject-matter ineligibility under Myriad - Following Myriad Genetic’s 2013 loss at the Supreme Court (Ass’n for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics, 133 S. Ct. 2107 (2013), herein “Myriad...more

Patent Update for IT and Biotech Companies: New Pieces to the Patent Puzzle


BIO IPCC Panel Discusses Impact of Myriad-Mayo Guidance

Yesterday, we reported on a session of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) Intellectual Property Counsel's Committee fall conference, which took place earlier this week in Nashville, TN, in which the U.S. Patent and...more

USPTO Provides Update on Status of Revised Myriad-Mayo Guidance

During a session of the Biotechnology Industry Organization (BIO) Intellectual Property Counsels Committee (IPCC) fall conference, which took place this week in Nashville, TN, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office provided a...more

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